Aortic antioxidant defense and lipid peroxidation in rabbits fed diets supplemented with different animal and plant fats

Michal J Toborek, David L. Feldman, Bernhard Hennig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To test the hypothesis that dietary fats, depending on the fat source, may modulate aortic lipid peroxidation and antioxidant protection. Methods: Rabbits were fed a low fat (LF, 2 g/100 g corn oil) diet or LF enriched with 16 g/100 g (w/w) of corn oil (CO), corn oil plus cholesterol (23.5 mg/100 g diet, CO+C), bovine milk fat (MF), chicken fat (CF), beef tallow (BT) or lard (L). After a 30-day feeding period, aortic lipid peroxidation, as well as antioxidant enzymes and vitamin E were measured. Results: In rabbits fed CO or L, aortic TBARS (a marker of lipid peroxidation) and total glutathione concentrations were greater but vitamin E levels were lower compared with the LF treatment. Moreover, in rabbits fed CO, elevated activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase but lowered activity of superoxide dismutase were observed. In rabbits fed the remaining high fat diets, including the CO+C diet, aortic lipid peroxidation and antioxidant activities/levels did not differ from those fed LF. Feeding rabbits high-fat diets for 30 days did not induce aortic lipid deposition. Conclusions: The present results indicate CO, and possibly L, as the fat sources which significantly increase aortic oxidative stress. Because long-term disturbances in redox status may be implicated in atherogenesis, excessive dietary intake of CO or L may significantly contribute to the injury of the vessel wall.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)32-38
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American College of Nutrition
Volume16
Issue number1
StatePublished - Feb 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

plant fats
Corn Oil
animal fats and oils
corn oil
Lipid Peroxidation
lipid peroxidation
Antioxidants
antioxidant activity
rabbits
Fats
Diet
Rabbits
diet
lipids
High Fat Diet
high fat diet
Vitamin E
vitamin E
antioxidants
atherogenesis

Keywords

  • antioxidant enzymes
  • cholesterol
  • dietary fats
  • lipid peroxidation
  • rabbits
  • vessel wall
  • vitamin E

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Aortic antioxidant defense and lipid peroxidation in rabbits fed diets supplemented with different animal and plant fats. / Toborek, Michal J; Feldman, David L.; Hennig, Bernhard.

In: Journal of the American College of Nutrition, Vol. 16, No. 1, 01.02.1997, p. 32-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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