Anxiety disorders, subsyndromic depressive episodes, and major depressive episodes: Do they differ on their impact on the quality of life of patients with epilepsy?

Andres M Kanner, John J. Barry, Frank Gilliam, Bruce Hermann, Kimford J. Meador

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims of the study: To compare the impact of anxiety disorders, major depressive episodes (MDEs), and subsyndromic depressive episodes (SSDEs) on the quality of life of patients with epilepsy (PWEs), and to identify the variables predictive of poor quality of life. Methods: Apsychiatric diagnosis according to DSM-IV-TR criteria was established in 188 consecutive PWEs with the MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Patients also completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), the Centers for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D), and the Quality of Life in Epilepsy-89 (QOLIE-89). A diagnosis of SSDE was made in any patient with total scores of the BDI-II >12 or CES-D >16 in the absence of any DSM-IV diagnosis of mood disorder according to the MINI. Results: Patients with SSDEs (n = 26) had a worse quality of life than asymptomatic patients (n = 103). This finding was also observed among patients with MDEs only (n = 10), anxiety disorders only (n = 21), or mixed MDEs/anxiety disorders (n = 28). Furthermore, having mixed SSDEs/anxiety disorders yielded a worse quality of life than having only SSDEs. Independent predictors of poor quality of life included having a psychiatric disorder and persistent epileptic seizures in the last 6 months. Conclusions: Although isolated mood and anxiety disorders, including SSDE, have a comparable negative impact on the quality of life of PWEs; the comorbid occurrence of mood and anxiety disorders yields a worse impact. In addition, seizure freedom in the previous 6 months predicts a better quality of life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1152-1158
Number of pages7
JournalEpilepsia
Volume51
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Anxiety Disorders
Epilepsy
Quality of Life
Mood Disorders
Depression
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Epidemiologic Studies
Equipment and Supplies
Psychiatry
Seizures
Interviews

Keywords

  • Antidepressant medication
  • Generalized anxiety disorder
  • Pharmacoresistant epilepsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Anxiety disorders, subsyndromic depressive episodes, and major depressive episodes : Do they differ on their impact on the quality of life of patients with epilepsy? / Kanner, Andres M; Barry, John J.; Gilliam, Frank; Hermann, Bruce; Meador, Kimford J.

In: Epilepsia, Vol. 51, No. 7, 07.2010, p. 1152-1158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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