Antibiotic treatment disrupts bacterial communities in the colon and rectum of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaques

Alexander S. Zevin, Tiffany Hensley-McBain, Charlene Miller, Elise Smith, Stanley Langevin, Nichole Klatt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Antibiotic therapies are known to disrupt gastrointestinal (GI) bacterial communities. HIV and pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infections have also been associated with disrupted GI bacterial communities. We administered a combination antibiotic therapy to six SIV-infected rhesus macaques and collected colon biopsies, stool samples and rectal swabs before and after antibiotics, and evaluated the bacterial communities at each sample site using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The colon mucosa and stool samples displayed different bacterial communities, while the rectal swabs showed a mixture of the mucosal and stool-associated bacteria. Antibiotics disrupted the native bacterial communities at each sample site. The colon mucosa showed depleted abundances of the dominant Helicobacteraceae, while we found depleted abundances of the dominant Ruminococcaceae sp. in the stool. The rectal swabs showed similar trends as the colon mucosa, but were more variable. After the antibiotic treatment, there were increased abundances of similar taxa of facultative anaerobic bacteria, including Lactobacillaceae and Enterobacteriaceae at each sample site.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFEMS Microbiology Letters
Volume364
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Simian Immunodeficiency Virus
Macaca
Rectum
Colon
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Mucous Membrane
Lactobacillaceae
Anaerobic Bacteria
Virus Diseases
Enterobacteriaceae
Macaca mulatta
rRNA Genes
HIV
Bacteria
Biopsy
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • antibiotics
  • HIV
  • macaque
  • microbiome
  • rectal swab
  • SIV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Antibiotic treatment disrupts bacterial communities in the colon and rectum of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaques. / Zevin, Alexander S.; Hensley-McBain, Tiffany; Miller, Charlene; Smith, Elise; Langevin, Stanley; Klatt, Nichole.

In: FEMS Microbiology Letters, Vol. 364, No. 23, 15.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zevin, Alexander S. ; Hensley-McBain, Tiffany ; Miller, Charlene ; Smith, Elise ; Langevin, Stanley ; Klatt, Nichole. / Antibiotic treatment disrupts bacterial communities in the colon and rectum of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaques. In: FEMS Microbiology Letters. 2017 ; Vol. 364, No. 23.
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