Animal studies help clarify misunderstandings about neonatal imitation

Elizabeth A Simpson, Sarah E. Maylott, Mikael Heimann, Francys Subiaul, Annika Paukner, Stephen J. Suomi, Pier F. Ferrari

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Empirical studies are incompatible with the proposal that neonatal imitation is arousal driven or declining with age. Nonhuman primate studies reveal a functioning brain mirror system from birth, developmental continuity in imitation and later sociability, and the malleability of neonatal imitation, shaped by the early environment. A narrow focus on arousal effects and reflexes may grossly underestimate neonatal capacities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e400
JournalThe Behavioral and brain sciences
Volume40
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Arousal
Primates
Reflex
Parturition
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Physiology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Simpson, E. A., Maylott, S. E., Heimann, M., Subiaul, F., Paukner, A., Suomi, S. J., & Ferrari, P. F. (2017). Animal studies help clarify misunderstandings about neonatal imitation. The Behavioral and brain sciences, 40, e400. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0140525X16001965

Animal studies help clarify misunderstandings about neonatal imitation. / Simpson, Elizabeth A; Maylott, Sarah E.; Heimann, Mikael; Subiaul, Francys; Paukner, Annika; Suomi, Stephen J.; Ferrari, Pier F.

In: The Behavioral and brain sciences, Vol. 40, 01.01.2017, p. e400.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Simpson, EA, Maylott, SE, Heimann, M, Subiaul, F, Paukner, A, Suomi, SJ & Ferrari, PF 2017, 'Animal studies help clarify misunderstandings about neonatal imitation', The Behavioral and brain sciences, vol. 40, pp. e400. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0140525X16001965
Simpson, Elizabeth A ; Maylott, Sarah E. ; Heimann, Mikael ; Subiaul, Francys ; Paukner, Annika ; Suomi, Stephen J. ; Ferrari, Pier F. / Animal studies help clarify misunderstandings about neonatal imitation. In: The Behavioral and brain sciences. 2017 ; Vol. 40. pp. e400.
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