Angiogenesis and vasculogenesis: Inducing the growth of new blood vessels and wound healing by stimulation of bone marrow-derived progenitor cell mobilization and homing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

130 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During embryonic development, the vasculature is among the first organs to form and is in charge of maintaining metabolic homeostasis by supplying oxygen and nutrients and removing waste products. As one would expect, blood vessels are critical not only for organ growth in the embryo but also for repair of wounded tissue in the adult. An imbalance in angiogenesis (a time-honored term that globally refers to the growth of new blood vessels) contributes to the pathogenesis of numerous malignant, inflammatory, ischemic, infectious, immune, and wound-healing disorders. This review focuses on the central role of the growth of new blood vessels in ischemic and diabetic wound healing and defines the most current nomenclature that describes the neovascularization process in wounds. There are now two well-defined, distinct, yet interrelated processes for the formation of postnatal new blood vessels, angiogenesis, and vasculogenesis. Reviewed are recent new data on vasculogenesis that promise to advance the field of wound healing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)39-47
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
Volume45
Issue number6 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Wound Healing
Blood Vessels
Stem Cells
Bone Marrow
Growth
Waste Products
Terminology
Embryonic Development
Homeostasis
Embryonic Structures
Oxygen
Food
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

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