Analysis of vascular access in intestinal transplant recipients using the Miami classification from the VIIIth International Small Bowel Transplant Symposium

Gennaro Selvaggi, Anthony Gyamfi, Tomoaki Kato, Barry Gelman, Shushma Aggarwal, Bruno Begliomini, James Bennett, Seigo Nishida, Andreas G. Tzakis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Loss of vascular access in patients with intestinal failure is considered an indication for intestinal transplantation. Such patients often have one or more occluded vein sites. Venous access could be classified according to the number of occluded vessels, to facilitate pre- and postoperative management. Methods. At the VIIIth International Small Bowel Transplant Symposium in September 2003, a new classification of vascular access in patients who were candidates for bowel transplant was proposed. The classification was then applied to stratify all patients that underwent intestinal transplantation at the University of Miami between 1998 and 2003. Data were collected on Doppler ultrasonography, angiography, and vein angioplasty in such patients. Results. A total of 106 cases in 91 patients were included in the study. Based on Doppler ultrasound results, 51.9% of patients fell into class I (no thrombosed vessels), 21.7% were in class II (one occluded vessel, or positive risk factors for thrombosis), 24.5% were in class III (multiple thrombosed vessels), and 1.9% were in class IV (all vessels thrombosed). Fifteen percent of the patients required preoperative angiography to better evaluate venous access. Most of the patients that required angiography were in class III or IV, and 53.3% of patients requiring angiography needed additional venous angioplasty to achieve access. Conclusions. All patients that are referred for intestinal transplantation should undergo preliminary mapping of their venous access by Doppler ultrasound and then be assigned to a vascular access class. Those patients with multiple thrombosed vessels (class III and above) should be strongly considered for additional angiographic evaluation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1639-1643
Number of pages5
JournalTransplantation
Volume79
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 27 2005

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Blood Vessels
Transplants
Thrombosis
Doppler Ultrasonography
Angiography
Transplantation
Angioplasty
Transplant Recipients
Veins

Keywords

  • Angiography
  • Doppler ultrasound
  • Intestinal transplantation
  • Vascular access

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Immunology

Cite this

Analysis of vascular access in intestinal transplant recipients using the Miami classification from the VIIIth International Small Bowel Transplant Symposium. / Selvaggi, Gennaro; Gyamfi, Anthony; Kato, Tomoaki; Gelman, Barry; Aggarwal, Shushma; Begliomini, Bruno; Bennett, James; Nishida, Seigo; Tzakis, Andreas G.

In: Transplantation, Vol. 79, No. 12, 27.06.2005, p. 1639-1643.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Selvaggi, Gennaro ; Gyamfi, Anthony ; Kato, Tomoaki ; Gelman, Barry ; Aggarwal, Shushma ; Begliomini, Bruno ; Bennett, James ; Nishida, Seigo ; Tzakis, Andreas G. / Analysis of vascular access in intestinal transplant recipients using the Miami classification from the VIIIth International Small Bowel Transplant Symposium. In: Transplantation. 2005 ; Vol. 79, No. 12. pp. 1639-1643.
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abstract = "Background. Loss of vascular access in patients with intestinal failure is considered an indication for intestinal transplantation. Such patients often have one or more occluded vein sites. Venous access could be classified according to the number of occluded vessels, to facilitate pre- and postoperative management. Methods. At the VIIIth International Small Bowel Transplant Symposium in September 2003, a new classification of vascular access in patients who were candidates for bowel transplant was proposed. The classification was then applied to stratify all patients that underwent intestinal transplantation at the University of Miami between 1998 and 2003. Data were collected on Doppler ultrasonography, angiography, and vein angioplasty in such patients. Results. A total of 106 cases in 91 patients were included in the study. Based on Doppler ultrasound results, 51.9{\%} of patients fell into class I (no thrombosed vessels), 21.7{\%} were in class II (one occluded vessel, or positive risk factors for thrombosis), 24.5{\%} were in class III (multiple thrombosed vessels), and 1.9{\%} were in class IV (all vessels thrombosed). Fifteen percent of the patients required preoperative angiography to better evaluate venous access. Most of the patients that required angiography were in class III or IV, and 53.3{\%} of patients requiring angiography needed additional venous angioplasty to achieve access. Conclusions. All patients that are referred for intestinal transplantation should undergo preliminary mapping of their venous access by Doppler ultrasound and then be assigned to a vascular access class. Those patients with multiple thrombosed vessels (class III and above) should be strongly considered for additional angiographic evaluation.",
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AU - Aggarwal, Shushma

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AU - Nishida, Seigo

AU - Tzakis, Andreas G.

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N2 - Background. Loss of vascular access in patients with intestinal failure is considered an indication for intestinal transplantation. Such patients often have one or more occluded vein sites. Venous access could be classified according to the number of occluded vessels, to facilitate pre- and postoperative management. Methods. At the VIIIth International Small Bowel Transplant Symposium in September 2003, a new classification of vascular access in patients who were candidates for bowel transplant was proposed. The classification was then applied to stratify all patients that underwent intestinal transplantation at the University of Miami between 1998 and 2003. Data were collected on Doppler ultrasonography, angiography, and vein angioplasty in such patients. Results. A total of 106 cases in 91 patients were included in the study. Based on Doppler ultrasound results, 51.9% of patients fell into class I (no thrombosed vessels), 21.7% were in class II (one occluded vessel, or positive risk factors for thrombosis), 24.5% were in class III (multiple thrombosed vessels), and 1.9% were in class IV (all vessels thrombosed). Fifteen percent of the patients required preoperative angiography to better evaluate venous access. Most of the patients that required angiography were in class III or IV, and 53.3% of patients requiring angiography needed additional venous angioplasty to achieve access. Conclusions. All patients that are referred for intestinal transplantation should undergo preliminary mapping of their venous access by Doppler ultrasound and then be assigned to a vascular access class. Those patients with multiple thrombosed vessels (class III and above) should be strongly considered for additional angiographic evaluation.

AB - Background. Loss of vascular access in patients with intestinal failure is considered an indication for intestinal transplantation. Such patients often have one or more occluded vein sites. Venous access could be classified according to the number of occluded vessels, to facilitate pre- and postoperative management. Methods. At the VIIIth International Small Bowel Transplant Symposium in September 2003, a new classification of vascular access in patients who were candidates for bowel transplant was proposed. The classification was then applied to stratify all patients that underwent intestinal transplantation at the University of Miami between 1998 and 2003. Data were collected on Doppler ultrasonography, angiography, and vein angioplasty in such patients. Results. A total of 106 cases in 91 patients were included in the study. Based on Doppler ultrasound results, 51.9% of patients fell into class I (no thrombosed vessels), 21.7% were in class II (one occluded vessel, or positive risk factors for thrombosis), 24.5% were in class III (multiple thrombosed vessels), and 1.9% were in class IV (all vessels thrombosed). Fifteen percent of the patients required preoperative angiography to better evaluate venous access. Most of the patients that required angiography were in class III or IV, and 53.3% of patients requiring angiography needed additional venous angioplasty to achieve access. Conclusions. All patients that are referred for intestinal transplantation should undergo preliminary mapping of their venous access by Doppler ultrasound and then be assigned to a vascular access class. Those patients with multiple thrombosed vessels (class III and above) should be strongly considered for additional angiographic evaluation.

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