Analysis of pediatric head injury from falls.

K. A. Kim, M. Y. Wang, P. M. Griffith, S. Summers, M. L. Levy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors conducted a study to describe the incidence and types of fall-related head injury observed at a pediatric trauma center. We performed a retrospective analysis of all patients under 15 years of age treated for fall-related trauma between 1992 and 1998. Falls were classified as low (< 15 feet) and high level (> or = 15 feet). Seven hundred twenty-nine cases were identified with a mortality rate of 1.7%. A fall of greater than 15 feet (high-level fall) was associated with a higher mortality rate than low-level falls (2.4% compared with 1.0%, respectively). Ninety-eight patients had sustained a calvarial fracture and 93 experienced a basal skull fracture. Twenty-six patients had suffered a cerebral contusion, 25 a subarachnoid hemorrhage, 22 a subdural hematoma, and 12 had an epidural hematoma. Forty-nine patients required surgery for traumatic injuries; of these, 10 underwent craniotomy for evacuation of a blood clot. Height was not predictive of the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score. In all four deaths resulting from a low-level fall there was an admission GCS score of 3, and abnormal findings were demonstrated on computerized tomography scanning. Death from high-level falls was attributable to either intracranial injuries (50%) or severe extracranial injuries (50%). Intracranial injury is the major source of fall-related death in children and, unlike extracranial insults, brain injuries are sustained with equal frequency from low- and high-level falls in this population. The only cause of mortality from low-level falls was intracranial injury. Trauma triage criteria must account for these differences in the pediatric population.

Original languageEnglish
JournalNeurosurgical focus [electronic resource].
Volume8
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Craniocerebral Trauma
Pediatrics
Wounds and Injuries
Glasgow Coma Scale
Mortality
Skull Fractures
Subdural Hematoma
Triage
Craniotomy
Trauma Centers
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Hematoma
Brain Injuries
Population
Thrombosis
Tomography
Incidence

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Kim, K. A., Wang, M. Y., Griffith, P. M., Summers, S., & Levy, M. L. (2000). Analysis of pediatric head injury from falls. Neurosurgical focus [electronic resource]., 8(1).

Analysis of pediatric head injury from falls. / Kim, K. A.; Wang, M. Y.; Griffith, P. M.; Summers, S.; Levy, M. L.

In: Neurosurgical focus [electronic resource]., Vol. 8, No. 1, 01.12.2000.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, KA, Wang, MY, Griffith, PM, Summers, S & Levy, ML 2000, 'Analysis of pediatric head injury from falls.', Neurosurgical focus [electronic resource]., vol. 8, no. 1.
Kim KA, Wang MY, Griffith PM, Summers S, Levy ML. Analysis of pediatric head injury from falls. Neurosurgical focus [electronic resource]. 2000 Dec 1;8(1).
Kim, K. A. ; Wang, M. Y. ; Griffith, P. M. ; Summers, S. ; Levy, M. L. / Analysis of pediatric head injury from falls. In: Neurosurgical focus [electronic resource]. 2000 ; Vol. 8, No. 1.
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