Analysis of human monoclonal antibodies derived from lymphocytes of patients with cancer

R. J. Cote, D. M. Morrissey, H. F. Oettgen, L. J. Old

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Human lymphocytes from tumor-bearing patients and normal individuals have been fused with the NS-1 mouse myeloma line or the LICR-LON-HMY2 (LICR-2) or SK0-007 human cell lines. For a given number of lymphocytes, fusions with NS-1 produced 8 times more clones than fusions with LICR-2 and >20 times more clones than fusions with SK0-007. The percentage of clones that secrete human immunoglobulin (Ig) and the range of Ig production were comparable for clones derived from the three myeloma/lymphoblastoid lines. Clones derived fronm fusions with LICR-2 and SK0-007 were found to secrete new species of light and heavy Ig chains in addition to those of the myeloma/lymphoblastoid lines, and clones derived from fusions with NS-1 secreted human Ig and contained both mouse and human chromosomes, which indicates that true hybrid cells were derived from fusions with each of the myeloma/lymphoblastoid lines under study. The stability of Ig production was similar for clones derived from fusions with NS-1, LICR-2, or SK0-007; these results were comparable to those obtained with standard mouse/mouse hybrids. Stable clones producing human monoclonal antibodies that react with cell surface, cytoplasmic, cytoskeletal, nuclear, or nucleolar antigens have been isolated from tumor-bearing patients and normal individuals. A number of human monoclonal antibodies reactive with cytoskeletal antigens appear to be directed against components of the intermediate filament family. Techniques for the production of human monoclonal antibody appear to be sufficiently advanced to initiate a serological dissection of the humoral immune response to cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2465-2469
Number of pages5
JournalFederation Proceedings
Volume43
Issue number9
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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