An interdisciplinary lens on consciousness

The consciousness continuum and how to (not) study it in the brain and the gut, a commentary on Williams and Poehlman

Hilke Plassmann, Milica Mormann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We welcome Williams and Poehlman's (this issue) effort to better conceptualize consciousness in consumer research. In this comment, our goal is to complement their ideas based on models and methods from cognitive and consumer neuroscience. We extend their suggestions in two important ways. First, we offer an extended framework based on a taxonomy of consciousness from visual neuroscience that suggests a continuum rather than a dichotomy between unconscious and conscious processes. This continuum is determined by the role of perception and attention and the communication between different functional systems in the brain. We then clarify and make suggestions about how different methods from the neurobiology toolbox can be used (or not) as measures of mediating and moderating variables underlying consciousness in consumer behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)258-265
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Consumer Research
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

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neurosciences
consciousness
brain
consumer research
consumption behavior
taxonomy
communication
Consciousness
Neuroscience

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Brain imaging
  • Functional
  • Gut bacteria
  • Neuroscience
  • Structural brain connectivity
  • Visual consciousness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Marketing

Cite this

An interdisciplinary lens on consciousness : The consciousness continuum and how to (not) study it in the brain and the gut, a commentary on Williams and Poehlman. / Plassmann, Hilke; Mormann, Milica.

In: Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 44, No. 2, 01.08.2017, p. 258-265.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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