An integrated view of the 1987 Australian monsoon and its mesoscale convective systems. II

vertical structure

Brian E Mapes, R. A. Houze

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The MCSs consisted of multicellular convective elements which in time gave rise to areas of stratiform precipitation. Each of the three basic building blocks of the MCSs - convective, intermediary, and stratiform precipitation areas - has a consistent, characteristic divergence profile. Convective areas have low-level convergence, with its peak at 2-4 km altitude, and divergence above 6 km. Intermediary areas have convergence aloft, peaked near 10 km, feeding into mean ascent high in the upper troposphere. Stratiform areas have mid-level convergence, indicating a mesoscale downdraught below the melting level, and a mesoscale updraught aloft. Rawinsonde composite divergence profiles agreewith the Doppler data in one important respect: the lower-tropospheric convergence into the MCS peaks 2-4 km above the surface. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationQuarterly Journal - Royal Meteorological Society
Pages733-754
Number of pages22
Volume119
Edition512
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

convective system
monsoon
divergence
updraft
troposphere
melting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Mapes, B. E., & Houze, R. A. (1993). An integrated view of the 1987 Australian monsoon and its mesoscale convective systems. II: vertical structure. In Quarterly Journal - Royal Meteorological Society (512 ed., Vol. 119, pp. 733-754)

An integrated view of the 1987 Australian monsoon and its mesoscale convective systems. II : vertical structure. / Mapes, Brian E; Houze, R. A.

Quarterly Journal - Royal Meteorological Society. Vol. 119 512. ed. 1993. p. 733-754.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Mapes, BE & Houze, RA 1993, An integrated view of the 1987 Australian monsoon and its mesoscale convective systems. II: vertical structure. in Quarterly Journal - Royal Meteorological Society. 512 edn, vol. 119, pp. 733-754.
Mapes BE, Houze RA. An integrated view of the 1987 Australian monsoon and its mesoscale convective systems. II: vertical structure. In Quarterly Journal - Royal Meteorological Society. 512 ed. Vol. 119. 1993. p. 733-754
Mapes, Brian E ; Houze, R. A. / An integrated view of the 1987 Australian monsoon and its mesoscale convective systems. II : vertical structure. Quarterly Journal - Royal Meteorological Society. Vol. 119 512. ed. 1993. pp. 733-754
@inbook{de4e3f4ed705406385d22e6529ad4f0b,
title = "An integrated view of the 1987 Australian monsoon and its mesoscale convective systems. II: vertical structure",
abstract = "The MCSs consisted of multicellular convective elements which in time gave rise to areas of stratiform precipitation. Each of the three basic building blocks of the MCSs - convective, intermediary, and stratiform precipitation areas - has a consistent, characteristic divergence profile. Convective areas have low-level convergence, with its peak at 2-4 km altitude, and divergence above 6 km. Intermediary areas have convergence aloft, peaked near 10 km, feeding into mean ascent high in the upper troposphere. Stratiform areas have mid-level convergence, indicating a mesoscale downdraught below the melting level, and a mesoscale updraught aloft. Rawinsonde composite divergence profiles agreewith the Doppler data in one important respect: the lower-tropospheric convergence into the MCS peaks 2-4 km above the surface. -from Authors",
author = "Mapes, {Brian E} and Houze, {R. A.}",
year = "1993",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "119",
pages = "733--754",
booktitle = "Quarterly Journal - Royal Meteorological Society",
edition = "512",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - An integrated view of the 1987 Australian monsoon and its mesoscale convective systems. II

T2 - vertical structure

AU - Mapes, Brian E

AU - Houze, R. A.

PY - 1993

Y1 - 1993

N2 - The MCSs consisted of multicellular convective elements which in time gave rise to areas of stratiform precipitation. Each of the three basic building blocks of the MCSs - convective, intermediary, and stratiform precipitation areas - has a consistent, characteristic divergence profile. Convective areas have low-level convergence, with its peak at 2-4 km altitude, and divergence above 6 km. Intermediary areas have convergence aloft, peaked near 10 km, feeding into mean ascent high in the upper troposphere. Stratiform areas have mid-level convergence, indicating a mesoscale downdraught below the melting level, and a mesoscale updraught aloft. Rawinsonde composite divergence profiles agreewith the Doppler data in one important respect: the lower-tropospheric convergence into the MCS peaks 2-4 km above the surface. -from Authors

AB - The MCSs consisted of multicellular convective elements which in time gave rise to areas of stratiform precipitation. Each of the three basic building blocks of the MCSs - convective, intermediary, and stratiform precipitation areas - has a consistent, characteristic divergence profile. Convective areas have low-level convergence, with its peak at 2-4 km altitude, and divergence above 6 km. Intermediary areas have convergence aloft, peaked near 10 km, feeding into mean ascent high in the upper troposphere. Stratiform areas have mid-level convergence, indicating a mesoscale downdraught below the melting level, and a mesoscale updraught aloft. Rawinsonde composite divergence profiles agreewith the Doppler data in one important respect: the lower-tropospheric convergence into the MCS peaks 2-4 km above the surface. -from Authors

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027832964&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027832964&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Chapter

VL - 119

SP - 733

EP - 754

BT - Quarterly Journal - Royal Meteorological Society

ER -