An increase in religiousness/spirituality occurs after HIV diagnosis and predicts slower disease progression over 4 years in people with HIV

Gail Ironson, Rick Stuetzle, Mary Ann Fletcher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

149 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Most studies on religion/spirituality predicting health outcomes have been limited to church attendance as a predictor and have focused on healthy people. However, confronting a major medical crisis may be a time when people turn to the sacred. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which changes in spirituality/religiousness occur after HIV diagnosis and whether changes predict disease progression. DESIGN/PARTICIPANTS: This longitudinal study examined the relationship between changes in spirituality/religiousness from before with after the diagnosis of HIV, and disease progression (CD4 and viral load [VL] every 6 months) over 4 years in 100 people with HIV. Measures included change in religiousness/ spirituality after diagnosis of HIV, religiousness/spirituality at various times in one's life, church attendance, depression, hopelessness, optimism, coping (avoidant, proactive), social support, CD4/VL, and health behaviors. RESULTS: Forty-five percent of the sample showed an increase in religiousness/ spirituality after the diagnosis of HIV, 42% remained the same, and 13% decreased. People reporting an increase in spirituality/religiousness after the diagnosis had significantly greater preservation of CD4 cells over the 4-year period, as well as significantly better control of VL. Results were independent of (i.e., held even after controlling for) church attendance and initial disease status (CD4/VL), medication at every time point, age, gender, race, education, health behaviors (adherence, risky sex, alcohol, cocaine), depression, hopelessness, optimism, coping (avoidant, proactive), and social support. CONCLUSIONS: There is an increase in spirituality/religiousness after HIV diagnosis, and this increase predicts slower disease progression; medical personnel should be aware of its potential importance.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of General Internal Medicine
Volume21
Issue numberSUPPL. 5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

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Spirituality
Disease Progression
HIV
Viral Load
Health Behavior
Social Support
Depression
Religion
Cocaine
Longitudinal Studies
Alcohols
Education
Health

Keywords

  • Coping
  • Disease progression
  • HIV
  • Religiousness
  • Spirituality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

An increase in religiousness/spirituality occurs after HIV diagnosis and predicts slower disease progression over 4 years in people with HIV. / Ironson, Gail; Stuetzle, Rick; Fletcher, Mary Ann.

In: Journal of General Internal Medicine, Vol. 21, No. SUPPL. 5, 01.12.2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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