An Exploratory Report on Electrographic Changes in the Cerebral Cortex following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury with Hyperthermia in the Rat

Joseph Wasserman, Laura Stone McGuire, Thomas Sick, Helen M. Bramlett, W. Dalton Dietrich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has the potential to perturb perception by disrupting electrical propagation within and between the thalamus and cerebral cortex. Moderate and severe TBI may result in posttraumatic epilepsy, a condition characterized by convulsive tonic-clonic seizures. Spike/wave discharges (SWDs) of generalized nonconvulsive seizures, also called absence seizures, may also occur as a consequence of brain trauma. As mild hyperthermia has been reported to exacerbate histopathological and behavioral outcomes, we used an unbiased algorithm to detect periodic increases in power across different frequency bands following single or double closed head injury (CHI) under normothermia and hyperthermia conditions. We demonstrated that mild TBI did not significantly alter the occurrence of events containing increases in power between the delta (0.5-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), and beta1 (12-20 Hz) frequency bands in the Sprague Dawley rat 12 weeks after injury. However, when hyperthermia (39°C) was induced before and after CHI, electrographic events containing a similar waveform and harmonic frequency to SWDs were observed in a subset of animals. Further experiments utilizing chronic recordings will need to be performed to determine if these trends lead to absence seizures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10-18
Number of pages9
JournalTherapeutic Hypothermia and Temperature Management
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

Keywords

  • hyperthermia
  • repetitive
  • seizures
  • traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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