An analysis of the differences in the acute hospitalization charges following minimally invasive versus open posterior lumbar interbody fusion: Presented at the 2009 Joint Spine Section Meeting - Clinical article

Michael Y. Wang, Matthew D. Cummock, Yong Yu, Rikin A. Trivedi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

104 Scopus citations

Abstract

Object. Minimally invasive spine (MIS) procedures are increasingly being recognized as equivalent to open procedures with regard to clinical and radiographic outcomes. These techniques are also believed to result in less pain and disability in the immediate postoperative period. There are, however, little data to assess whether these procedures produce their intended result and even fewer objective data to demonstrate that they are cost effective when compared with open surgery. Methods. The authors performed a retrospective analysis of hospital charges for 1- and 2-level MIS and open posterior interbody fusion for lumbar spondylotic disease, disc degeneration, and spondylolisthesis treated at a single academic medical center. Patients presenting with bilateral neurological symptoms were treated with open surgery, and those with unilateral symptoms were treated with MIS. Overall hospital charges and surgical episode-related charges, length of stay (LOS), and discharge status were obtained from the hospital finance department and adjusted for multi-/single-level surgeries. Results. During a 14-month period, 74 patients (mean age 55 years) were treated. The series included 59 single-level operations (75% MIS and 25% open), and 15 2-level surgeries (53% MIS and 47% open). The demographic profile, including age and Charlson Comorbidity Index, were similar between the 4 groups. The mean LOS for patients undergoing single-level surgery was 3.9 and 4.8 days in the MIS and open cases, respectively (p = 0.017). For those undergoing 2-level surgery, the mean LOS was 5.1 for MIS versus 7.1 for open surgery (p = 0.259). With respect to hospital charges, single-level MIS procedures were associated with an average of $70,159 compared with $78,444 for open surgery (p = 0.027). For 2-level surgery, mean charges totalled $87,454 for MIS versus $108,843 for open surgery (p = 0.071). For single-level surgeries, 5 and 20% of patients undergoing MIS and open surgery, respectively, were discharged to inpatient rehabilitation. For 2-level surgeries, the rates were 13 and 29%, respectively. Conclusions. While hospital setting, treatment population, patient selection, and physician expectation play major roles in determining hospital charges and LOS, this pilot study at an academic teaching hospital shows trends for quicker discharge, reduced hospital charges, and lower transfer rates to inpatient rehabilitation with MIS. However, larger multicenter studies are necessary to validate these findings and their relevance across diverse US practice environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)694-699
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery: Spine
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010

Keywords

  • Complications
  • Cost analysis
  • Economic analysis
  • Length of stay
  • Minimally invasive surgery
  • Socioeconomic study
  • Spine surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery
  • Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'An analysis of the differences in the acute hospitalization charges following minimally invasive versus open posterior lumbar interbody fusion: Presented at the 2009 Joint Spine Section Meeting - Clinical article'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this