Amyloid beta accumulation in HIV-1-infected brain: The role of the blood brain barrier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In recent years, we face an increase in the aging of the HIV-1-infected population, which is not only due to effective antiretroviral therapy but also to new infections among older people. Even with the use of the antiretroviral therapy, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders represent an increasing problem as the HIV-1-infected population ages. Increased amyloid beta (Aβ) deposition is characteristic of HIV-1-infected brains, and it has been hypothesized that brain vascular dysfunction contributes to this phenomenon, with a critical role suggested for the blood-brain barrier in brain Aβ homeostasis. This review will describe the mechanisms by which the blood-brain barrier may contribute to brain Aβ accumulation, and our findings in the context of HIV-1 infection will be discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-49
Number of pages7
JournalIUBMB Life
Volume65
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Fingerprint

Blood-Brain Barrier
Amyloid
HIV-1
Brain
Population
HIV Infections
Blood Vessels
Homeostasis
Aging of materials
HIV
Therapeutics
Infection

Keywords

  • amyloid beta
  • blood-brain barrier
  • brain endothelial cell
  • HIV-1
  • HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Amyloid beta accumulation in HIV-1-infected brain : The role of the blood brain barrier. / Andras, Ibolya Edit; Toborek, Michal J.

In: IUBMB Life, Vol. 65, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 43-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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