Americans' attitudes toward drug-related issues from 1975-2006: The roles of period and cohort effects

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the importance of the "war on drugs," little research has examined Americans' attitudes toward drug-related issues. In particular, the extant literature has not considered period and cohort effects for views about drug control issues, although there are theoretical reasons to expect both to be important In this paper the roles of period and cohort effects, net of individual-level predictors, for attitudes toward both governmental spending to address drug addiction and legalizing marijuana use were examined. Data from the General Social Surveys (1975 through 2006) were used. The logistic regression results showed variations in attitudes over time for both addiction spending and legalizing marijuana use. Cohort effects were also evident. The results suggest that a liberalization of attitudes, both over time and across cohorts, may be occurring, especially for the legalization of marijuana use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)461-494
Number of pages34
JournalJournal of Drug Issues
Volume40
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

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Cohort Effect
Cannabis
drug
Pharmaceutical Preparations
legalization
drug dependence
Drug and Narcotic Control
addiction
Substance-Related Disorders
liberalization
Logistic Models
logistics
regression
Research
time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Americans' attitudes toward drug-related issues from 1975-2006 : The roles of period and cohort effects. / Nielsen, Amie L.

In: Journal of Drug Issues, Vol. 40, No. 2, 01.03.2010, p. 461-494.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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