Altered blood flow in the ophthalmic and internal carotid arteries in patients with age-related macular degeneration measured using noncontrast mr angiography at 7t

M. L. Hibert, Y. I. Chen, N. Ohringer, W. J. Feuer, N. K. Waheed, J. S. Heier, M. W. Calhoun, P. J. Rosenfeld, J. R. Polimeni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Age-related macular degeneration is associated with reduced perfusion of the eye; however, the role of altered blood flow in the upstream ophthalmic or internal carotid arteries is unclear. We used ultra-high-field MR imaging to investigate whether the diameter of and blood flow in the ophthalmic artery and/or the ICA are altered in age-related macular degeneration and whether any blood flow changes are associated with disease progression. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-four patients with age-related macular degeneration and 13 similarly-aged healthy controls participated. TOF and high-resolution dynamic 2D phase-contrast MRA (0.26×0.26×2mm3, 100-ms effective sampling rate) was acquired at 7T. Vessel diameters were calculated from cross-sectional areas in phase-contrast acquisitions. Blood flow time-series were measured across the cardiac cycle. RESULTS: The ophthalmic artery vessel diameter was found to be significantly smaller in patients with age-related macular degeneration than in controls. Volumetric flow through the ophthalmic artery was significantly lower in patients with late age-related macular degeneration, with a significant trend of decreasing volumetric ophthalmic artery flow rates with increasing disease severity. The resistance index was significantly greater in patients with age-related macular degeneration than in controls in the ophthalmic artery. Flow velocity through the ophthalmic artery and ICA was significantly higher in patients with age-related macular degeneration. Ophthalmic artery blood flow as a percentage of ipsilateral ICA blood flow was nearly double in controls than in patients with age-related macular degeneration. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support the hypothesis that vascular changes upstream to the eye are associated with the severity of age-related macular degeneration. Additional investigation into the potential causality of this relationship and whether treatments that improve ocular circulation slow disease progression is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1653-1660
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume42
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2021
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Altered blood flow in the ophthalmic and internal carotid arteries in patients with age-related macular degeneration measured using noncontrast mr angiography at 7t'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this