Alterations in cardiac and pulmonary function in pédiatrie rapid human immunodeficiency virus type 1 disease progressors

William T. Shearer, Steven E Lipshultz, Kirk A. Easley, Kenneth Mclntosh, Jane Pitt, Thomas C. Quinn, Meyer Kattan, Johanna Goldfarb, Ellen Cooper, Yvonne Bryson, Andrea Kovacs, J. Timothy Bricker, Hannah Peavy, Robert B. Mellins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. Infants with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can be divided into rapid progressors (RPs) and non-rapid progressors (nonRPs) based on symptoms and immunologie status, but detailed information about cardiac and pulmonary function in RP and non-RP children needs to be adequately described. Methodology. Cardiac, pulmonary, and immunologie data and HIV-1 RNA burden were periodically measured in 3 groups: group I, 205 vertically infected children enrolled from 1990 to 1994 and followed through 1996; group II, a prospectively studied cohort enrolled at birth that included 93 infected (group Ha); and 463 noninfected infants (group lib). Results. Mean respiratory rates were generally higher in group Ha RP than non-RP children throughout the period of follow-up, achieving statistical signifance at 1 month, 12 months, 24 months, 30 months, and 48 months of follow-up. Non-RP and group lib (HIV-uninfected children) had similar mean respiratory rates from birth to 5 years of age. Significant differences in mean respiratory rates were found between group I RP and non-RP at 7 age intervals over the first 6 years of life. Mean respiratory rates were higher in RP than in non-RP at <1 year, 2.0 years, 2.5 years, 3.0 years, 3.5 years, 4.0 years, and 6.0 years of age. Mean heart rates in group lia RP, non-RP, and group lib differed at every age. Rapid progressors had higher mean heart rates than non-RP at all ages through 24 months. Mean heart rates at 30 months through 60 months of age were similar for RP and non-RP children. Non-RP children had higher mean heart rates than did group lib at 8 months, 24 months, 36 months, 42 months, 48 months, 54 months, and 60 months of age. In group I, RP had higher mean heart rates than non-RP at 2.0 years, 2.5 years, 3.0 years, and 4.0 years of age. After 4 years of age, the non-RP and RP had similar mean heart rates. Mean fractional shortening differed between the 3 group II subsets (RP, non-RP, and lib) at 4, 8,12,16, and 20 months of age. Although mean fractional shortening was lower in RP than in non-RP in group II at all time points between 1 and 20 months, the mean fractional shortening was significantly lower in RP only at 8 months when restricting the statistical comparisons to the 2 HIV-infected groups (RP and non-RP). Mean fractional shortening increased in the first 8 months of life followed by a gradual decline through 5 years of age among group lib children. No significant differences among the 3 groups in mean fractional shortening were detected after 20 months of age. In group I, differences between RP and non-RP in mean fractional shortening were detected at 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 years of age. After 3 years of age, group means for fractional shortening in RP and non-RP did not differ. Because of the limited data from the first months of the group I patients, it could not be determined whether this group experienced the gradual early rise in mean fractional shortening seen in the group II infants. In group Ha, RP had more clinical (eg, oxygen saturation <96%) and chest radiographie abnormalities (eg, cardiomegaly) at 18 months of life. RP also had significantly higher 5-year cumulative mortality than non-RP, higher HIV-1 viral burdens than non-RP, and lower CD8+ T-cell counts. Conclusions. Rapid disease progression in HIV-1infected infants is associated with significant alterations in heart and lung function: increased respiratory rate, increased heart rate, and decreased fractional shortening. The same children exhibited the anticipated significantly increased 5-year cumulative mortality, increased serum HIV-1 RNA load, and decreased CD8+ (cytotoxic) T-cell counts. Measurements of cardiopulmonary function in HIV-1-infected children seem to be useful in the total assessment of HIV-1 disease progression. human immunodeficiency virus infections. human immunodeficiency virus type 1, child, infant, newbom, diseases, disease progression, cohort studies, lung, heart.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)108-109
Number of pages2
JournalPediatrics
Volume105
Issue number1 II
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Virus Diseases
HIV-1
Lung
Heart Rate
Respiratory Rate
Disease Progression
HIV
Age Groups
Cell Count
Parturition
RNA
T-Lymphocytes
HIV-2
Mortality
Cardiomegaly
Viral Load
Cohort Studies
Thorax
Oxygen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Shearer, W. T., Lipshultz, S. E., Easley, K. A., Mclntosh, K., Pitt, J., Quinn, T. C., ... Mellins, R. B. (2000). Alterations in cardiac and pulmonary function in pédiatrie rapid human immunodeficiency virus type 1 disease progressors. Pediatrics, 105(1 II), 108-109.

Alterations in cardiac and pulmonary function in pédiatrie rapid human immunodeficiency virus type 1 disease progressors. / Shearer, William T.; Lipshultz, Steven E; Easley, Kirk A.; Mclntosh, Kenneth; Pitt, Jane; Quinn, Thomas C.; Kattan, Meyer; Goldfarb, Johanna; Cooper, Ellen; Bryson, Yvonne; Kovacs, Andrea; Timothy Bricker, J.; Peavy, Hannah; Mellins, Robert B.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 105, No. 1 II, 01.12.2000, p. 108-109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shearer, WT, Lipshultz, SE, Easley, KA, Mclntosh, K, Pitt, J, Quinn, TC, Kattan, M, Goldfarb, J, Cooper, E, Bryson, Y, Kovacs, A, Timothy Bricker, J, Peavy, H & Mellins, RB 2000, 'Alterations in cardiac and pulmonary function in pédiatrie rapid human immunodeficiency virus type 1 disease progressors', Pediatrics, vol. 105, no. 1 II, pp. 108-109.
Shearer WT, Lipshultz SE, Easley KA, Mclntosh K, Pitt J, Quinn TC et al. Alterations in cardiac and pulmonary function in pédiatrie rapid human immunodeficiency virus type 1 disease progressors. Pediatrics. 2000 Dec 1;105(1 II):108-109.
Shearer, William T. ; Lipshultz, Steven E ; Easley, Kirk A. ; Mclntosh, Kenneth ; Pitt, Jane ; Quinn, Thomas C. ; Kattan, Meyer ; Goldfarb, Johanna ; Cooper, Ellen ; Bryson, Yvonne ; Kovacs, Andrea ; Timothy Bricker, J. ; Peavy, Hannah ; Mellins, Robert B. / Alterations in cardiac and pulmonary function in pédiatrie rapid human immunodeficiency virus type 1 disease progressors. In: Pediatrics. 2000 ; Vol. 105, No. 1 II. pp. 108-109.
@article{0e97cb47aa274a9db11854667bd24416,
title = "Alterations in cardiac and pulmonary function in p{\'e}diatrie rapid human immunodeficiency virus type 1 disease progressors",
abstract = "Objective. Infants with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can be divided into rapid progressors (RPs) and non-rapid progressors (nonRPs) based on symptoms and immunologie status, but detailed information about cardiac and pulmonary function in RP and non-RP children needs to be adequately described. Methodology. Cardiac, pulmonary, and immunologie data and HIV-1 RNA burden were periodically measured in 3 groups: group I, 205 vertically infected children enrolled from 1990 to 1994 and followed through 1996; group II, a prospectively studied cohort enrolled at birth that included 93 infected (group Ha); and 463 noninfected infants (group lib). Results. Mean respiratory rates were generally higher in group Ha RP than non-RP children throughout the period of follow-up, achieving statistical signifance at 1 month, 12 months, 24 months, 30 months, and 48 months of follow-up. Non-RP and group lib (HIV-uninfected children) had similar mean respiratory rates from birth to 5 years of age. Significant differences in mean respiratory rates were found between group I RP and non-RP at 7 age intervals over the first 6 years of life. Mean respiratory rates were higher in RP than in non-RP at <1 year, 2.0 years, 2.5 years, 3.0 years, 3.5 years, 4.0 years, and 6.0 years of age. Mean heart rates in group lia RP, non-RP, and group lib differed at every age. Rapid progressors had higher mean heart rates than non-RP at all ages through 24 months. Mean heart rates at 30 months through 60 months of age were similar for RP and non-RP children. Non-RP children had higher mean heart rates than did group lib at 8 months, 24 months, 36 months, 42 months, 48 months, 54 months, and 60 months of age. In group I, RP had higher mean heart rates than non-RP at 2.0 years, 2.5 years, 3.0 years, and 4.0 years of age. After 4 years of age, the non-RP and RP had similar mean heart rates. Mean fractional shortening differed between the 3 group II subsets (RP, non-RP, and lib) at 4, 8,12,16, and 20 months of age. Although mean fractional shortening was lower in RP than in non-RP in group II at all time points between 1 and 20 months, the mean fractional shortening was significantly lower in RP only at 8 months when restricting the statistical comparisons to the 2 HIV-infected groups (RP and non-RP). Mean fractional shortening increased in the first 8 months of life followed by a gradual decline through 5 years of age among group lib children. No significant differences among the 3 groups in mean fractional shortening were detected after 20 months of age. In group I, differences between RP and non-RP in mean fractional shortening were detected at 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 years of age. After 3 years of age, group means for fractional shortening in RP and non-RP did not differ. Because of the limited data from the first months of the group I patients, it could not be determined whether this group experienced the gradual early rise in mean fractional shortening seen in the group II infants. In group Ha, RP had more clinical (eg, oxygen saturation <96{\%}) and chest radiographie abnormalities (eg, cardiomegaly) at 18 months of life. RP also had significantly higher 5-year cumulative mortality than non-RP, higher HIV-1 viral burdens than non-RP, and lower CD8+ T-cell counts. Conclusions. Rapid disease progression in HIV-1infected infants is associated with significant alterations in heart and lung function: increased respiratory rate, increased heart rate, and decreased fractional shortening. The same children exhibited the anticipated significantly increased 5-year cumulative mortality, increased serum HIV-1 RNA load, and decreased CD8+ (cytotoxic) T-cell counts. Measurements of cardiopulmonary function in HIV-1-infected children seem to be useful in the total assessment of HIV-1 disease progression. human immunodeficiency virus infections. human immunodeficiency virus type 1, child, infant, newbom, diseases, disease progression, cohort studies, lung, heart.",
author = "Shearer, {William T.} and Lipshultz, {Steven E} and Easley, {Kirk A.} and Kenneth Mclntosh and Jane Pitt and Quinn, {Thomas C.} and Meyer Kattan and Johanna Goldfarb and Ellen Cooper and Yvonne Bryson and Andrea Kovacs and {Timothy Bricker}, J. and Hannah Peavy and Mellins, {Robert B.}",
year = "2000",
month = "12",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "105",
pages = "108--109",
journal = "Pediatrics",
issn = "0031-4005",
publisher = "American Academy of Pediatrics",
number = "1 II",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Alterations in cardiac and pulmonary function in pédiatrie rapid human immunodeficiency virus type 1 disease progressors

AU - Shearer, William T.

AU - Lipshultz, Steven E

AU - Easley, Kirk A.

AU - Mclntosh, Kenneth

AU - Pitt, Jane

AU - Quinn, Thomas C.

AU - Kattan, Meyer

AU - Goldfarb, Johanna

AU - Cooper, Ellen

AU - Bryson, Yvonne

AU - Kovacs, Andrea

AU - Timothy Bricker, J.

AU - Peavy, Hannah

AU - Mellins, Robert B.

PY - 2000/12/1

Y1 - 2000/12/1

N2 - Objective. Infants with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can be divided into rapid progressors (RPs) and non-rapid progressors (nonRPs) based on symptoms and immunologie status, but detailed information about cardiac and pulmonary function in RP and non-RP children needs to be adequately described. Methodology. Cardiac, pulmonary, and immunologie data and HIV-1 RNA burden were periodically measured in 3 groups: group I, 205 vertically infected children enrolled from 1990 to 1994 and followed through 1996; group II, a prospectively studied cohort enrolled at birth that included 93 infected (group Ha); and 463 noninfected infants (group lib). Results. Mean respiratory rates were generally higher in group Ha RP than non-RP children throughout the period of follow-up, achieving statistical signifance at 1 month, 12 months, 24 months, 30 months, and 48 months of follow-up. Non-RP and group lib (HIV-uninfected children) had similar mean respiratory rates from birth to 5 years of age. Significant differences in mean respiratory rates were found between group I RP and non-RP at 7 age intervals over the first 6 years of life. Mean respiratory rates were higher in RP than in non-RP at <1 year, 2.0 years, 2.5 years, 3.0 years, 3.5 years, 4.0 years, and 6.0 years of age. Mean heart rates in group lia RP, non-RP, and group lib differed at every age. Rapid progressors had higher mean heart rates than non-RP at all ages through 24 months. Mean heart rates at 30 months through 60 months of age were similar for RP and non-RP children. Non-RP children had higher mean heart rates than did group lib at 8 months, 24 months, 36 months, 42 months, 48 months, 54 months, and 60 months of age. In group I, RP had higher mean heart rates than non-RP at 2.0 years, 2.5 years, 3.0 years, and 4.0 years of age. After 4 years of age, the non-RP and RP had similar mean heart rates. Mean fractional shortening differed between the 3 group II subsets (RP, non-RP, and lib) at 4, 8,12,16, and 20 months of age. Although mean fractional shortening was lower in RP than in non-RP in group II at all time points between 1 and 20 months, the mean fractional shortening was significantly lower in RP only at 8 months when restricting the statistical comparisons to the 2 HIV-infected groups (RP and non-RP). Mean fractional shortening increased in the first 8 months of life followed by a gradual decline through 5 years of age among group lib children. No significant differences among the 3 groups in mean fractional shortening were detected after 20 months of age. In group I, differences between RP and non-RP in mean fractional shortening were detected at 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 years of age. After 3 years of age, group means for fractional shortening in RP and non-RP did not differ. Because of the limited data from the first months of the group I patients, it could not be determined whether this group experienced the gradual early rise in mean fractional shortening seen in the group II infants. In group Ha, RP had more clinical (eg, oxygen saturation <96%) and chest radiographie abnormalities (eg, cardiomegaly) at 18 months of life. RP also had significantly higher 5-year cumulative mortality than non-RP, higher HIV-1 viral burdens than non-RP, and lower CD8+ T-cell counts. Conclusions. Rapid disease progression in HIV-1infected infants is associated with significant alterations in heart and lung function: increased respiratory rate, increased heart rate, and decreased fractional shortening. The same children exhibited the anticipated significantly increased 5-year cumulative mortality, increased serum HIV-1 RNA load, and decreased CD8+ (cytotoxic) T-cell counts. Measurements of cardiopulmonary function in HIV-1-infected children seem to be useful in the total assessment of HIV-1 disease progression. human immunodeficiency virus infections. human immunodeficiency virus type 1, child, infant, newbom, diseases, disease progression, cohort studies, lung, heart.

AB - Objective. Infants with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can be divided into rapid progressors (RPs) and non-rapid progressors (nonRPs) based on symptoms and immunologie status, but detailed information about cardiac and pulmonary function in RP and non-RP children needs to be adequately described. Methodology. Cardiac, pulmonary, and immunologie data and HIV-1 RNA burden were periodically measured in 3 groups: group I, 205 vertically infected children enrolled from 1990 to 1994 and followed through 1996; group II, a prospectively studied cohort enrolled at birth that included 93 infected (group Ha); and 463 noninfected infants (group lib). Results. Mean respiratory rates were generally higher in group Ha RP than non-RP children throughout the period of follow-up, achieving statistical signifance at 1 month, 12 months, 24 months, 30 months, and 48 months of follow-up. Non-RP and group lib (HIV-uninfected children) had similar mean respiratory rates from birth to 5 years of age. Significant differences in mean respiratory rates were found between group I RP and non-RP at 7 age intervals over the first 6 years of life. Mean respiratory rates were higher in RP than in non-RP at <1 year, 2.0 years, 2.5 years, 3.0 years, 3.5 years, 4.0 years, and 6.0 years of age. Mean heart rates in group lia RP, non-RP, and group lib differed at every age. Rapid progressors had higher mean heart rates than non-RP at all ages through 24 months. Mean heart rates at 30 months through 60 months of age were similar for RP and non-RP children. Non-RP children had higher mean heart rates than did group lib at 8 months, 24 months, 36 months, 42 months, 48 months, 54 months, and 60 months of age. In group I, RP had higher mean heart rates than non-RP at 2.0 years, 2.5 years, 3.0 years, and 4.0 years of age. After 4 years of age, the non-RP and RP had similar mean heart rates. Mean fractional shortening differed between the 3 group II subsets (RP, non-RP, and lib) at 4, 8,12,16, and 20 months of age. Although mean fractional shortening was lower in RP than in non-RP in group II at all time points between 1 and 20 months, the mean fractional shortening was significantly lower in RP only at 8 months when restricting the statistical comparisons to the 2 HIV-infected groups (RP and non-RP). Mean fractional shortening increased in the first 8 months of life followed by a gradual decline through 5 years of age among group lib children. No significant differences among the 3 groups in mean fractional shortening were detected after 20 months of age. In group I, differences between RP and non-RP in mean fractional shortening were detected at 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 years of age. After 3 years of age, group means for fractional shortening in RP and non-RP did not differ. Because of the limited data from the first months of the group I patients, it could not be determined whether this group experienced the gradual early rise in mean fractional shortening seen in the group II infants. In group Ha, RP had more clinical (eg, oxygen saturation <96%) and chest radiographie abnormalities (eg, cardiomegaly) at 18 months of life. RP also had significantly higher 5-year cumulative mortality than non-RP, higher HIV-1 viral burdens than non-RP, and lower CD8+ T-cell counts. Conclusions. Rapid disease progression in HIV-1infected infants is associated with significant alterations in heart and lung function: increased respiratory rate, increased heart rate, and decreased fractional shortening. The same children exhibited the anticipated significantly increased 5-year cumulative mortality, increased serum HIV-1 RNA load, and decreased CD8+ (cytotoxic) T-cell counts. Measurements of cardiopulmonary function in HIV-1-infected children seem to be useful in the total assessment of HIV-1 disease progression. human immunodeficiency virus infections. human immunodeficiency virus type 1, child, infant, newbom, diseases, disease progression, cohort studies, lung, heart.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33748530382&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33748530382&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:33748530382

VL - 105

SP - 108

EP - 109

JO - Pediatrics

JF - Pediatrics

SN - 0031-4005

IS - 1 II

ER -