Allergic mucociliary dysfunction

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This brief summary of several studies relating to allergic mucociliary dysfunction suggests that (1) mucociliary transport in the lower airways (and possibly in the nose) is impaired in subjects with allergic airway disease, (2) acute antigen challenge causes a further impairment of mucociliary transport that is related to chemical mediators, and (3) the elaboration of abnormal respiratory secretions is, at least in part, responsible for acute allergic mucociliary dysfunction. It is apparent from the currently available information that some of the in vivo and in vitro studies carried out in patients with allergic asthma would have to be applied to patients with allergic rhinitis. With respect to the management of patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma, the use of antiallergic agents such as cromolyn sodium or specific mediator antagonists (as they become available) seems to be justified when considering the important role of mucociliary dysfunction in the manifestations of allergic airway disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)347-350
Number of pages4
JournalThe Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume72
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1983

Fingerprint

Mucociliary Clearance
Asthma
Anti-Allergic Agents
Cromolyn Sodium
Acute Disease
Nose
Antigens
Allergic Rhinitis
In Vitro Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Allergic mucociliary dysfunction. / Wanner, Adam.

In: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 72, No. 4, 01.01.1983, p. 347-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{369994b019b34afbaf20a3a49ca9a3dc,
title = "Allergic mucociliary dysfunction",
abstract = "This brief summary of several studies relating to allergic mucociliary dysfunction suggests that (1) mucociliary transport in the lower airways (and possibly in the nose) is impaired in subjects with allergic airway disease, (2) acute antigen challenge causes a further impairment of mucociliary transport that is related to chemical mediators, and (3) the elaboration of abnormal respiratory secretions is, at least in part, responsible for acute allergic mucociliary dysfunction. It is apparent from the currently available information that some of the in vivo and in vitro studies carried out in patients with allergic asthma would have to be applied to patients with allergic rhinitis. With respect to the management of patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma, the use of antiallergic agents such as cromolyn sodium or specific mediator antagonists (as they become available) seems to be justified when considering the important role of mucociliary dysfunction in the manifestations of allergic airway disease.",
author = "Adam Wanner",
year = "1983",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0091-6749(83)90498-0",
language = "English",
volume = "72",
pages = "347--350",
journal = "Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology",
issn = "0091-6749",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Allergic mucociliary dysfunction

AU - Wanner, Adam

PY - 1983/1/1

Y1 - 1983/1/1

N2 - This brief summary of several studies relating to allergic mucociliary dysfunction suggests that (1) mucociliary transport in the lower airways (and possibly in the nose) is impaired in subjects with allergic airway disease, (2) acute antigen challenge causes a further impairment of mucociliary transport that is related to chemical mediators, and (3) the elaboration of abnormal respiratory secretions is, at least in part, responsible for acute allergic mucociliary dysfunction. It is apparent from the currently available information that some of the in vivo and in vitro studies carried out in patients with allergic asthma would have to be applied to patients with allergic rhinitis. With respect to the management of patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma, the use of antiallergic agents such as cromolyn sodium or specific mediator antagonists (as they become available) seems to be justified when considering the important role of mucociliary dysfunction in the manifestations of allergic airway disease.

AB - This brief summary of several studies relating to allergic mucociliary dysfunction suggests that (1) mucociliary transport in the lower airways (and possibly in the nose) is impaired in subjects with allergic airway disease, (2) acute antigen challenge causes a further impairment of mucociliary transport that is related to chemical mediators, and (3) the elaboration of abnormal respiratory secretions is, at least in part, responsible for acute allergic mucociliary dysfunction. It is apparent from the currently available information that some of the in vivo and in vitro studies carried out in patients with allergic asthma would have to be applied to patients with allergic rhinitis. With respect to the management of patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma, the use of antiallergic agents such as cromolyn sodium or specific mediator antagonists (as they become available) seems to be justified when considering the important role of mucociliary dysfunction in the manifestations of allergic airway disease.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0020589819&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0020589819&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0091-6749(83)90498-0

DO - 10.1016/0091-6749(83)90498-0

M3 - Article

C2 - 6352779

AN - SCOPUS:0020589819

VL - 72

SP - 347

EP - 350

JO - Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

JF - Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

SN - 0091-6749

IS - 4

ER -