Alcohol use and risk of intracerebral hemorrhage

Ching Jen Chen, W. Mark Brown, Charles J. Moomaw, Carl D. Langefeld, Jennifer Osborne, Bradford B. Worrall, Daniel Woo, Sebastian Koch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To analyze the dose-risk relationship for alcohol consumption and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in the Ethnic/Racial Variations of Intracerebral Hemorrhage (ERICH) study. Methods: ERICH is a multicenter, prospective, case-control study, designed to recruit 1,000 non-Hispanic white patients, 1,000 non-Hispanic black patients, and 1,000 Hispanic patients with ICH. Cases were matched 1:1 to ICH-free controls by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and geographic area. Comprehensive interviews included questions regarding alcohol consumption. Patterns of alcohol consumption were categorized as none, rare (<1 drink per month), moderate (≥1 drink per month and ≤2 drinks per day), intermediate (>2 drinks per day and <5 drinks per day), and heavy (≥5 drinks per day). ICH risk was calculated using the no-alcohol use category as the reference group. Results: Multivariable analyses demonstrated an ordinal trend for alcohol consumption: Rare (odds ratio [OR] 0.57, p < 0.0001), moderate (OR 0.65, p < 0.0001), intermediate (OR 0.82, p = 0.2666), and heavy alcohol consumption (OR 1.77, p = 0.0003). Subgroup analyses demonstrated an association of rare and moderate alcohol consumption with decreased risk of both lobar and nonlobar ICH. Heavy alcohol consumption demonstrated a strong association with increased nonlobar ICH risk (OR 2.04, p = 0.0003). Heavy alcohol consumption was associated with significant increase in nonlobar ICH risk in black (OR 2.34, p = 0.0140) and Hispanic participants (OR 12.32, p < 0.0001). A similar association was not found in white participants. Conclusions: This study demonstrated potential protective effects of rare and moderate alcohol consumption on ICH risk. Heavy alcohol consumption was associated with increased ICH risk. Race/ethnicity was a significant factor in alcohol-associated ICH risk; heavy alcohol consumption in black and Hispanic participants poses significant nonlobar ICH risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2043-2051
Number of pages9
JournalNeurology
Volume88
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - May 23 2017

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Cerebral Hemorrhage
Alcohol Drinking
Alcohols
Odds Ratio
Hispanic Americans
Case-Control Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Chen, C. J., Brown, W. M., Moomaw, C. J., Langefeld, C. D., Osborne, J., Worrall, B. B., ... Koch, S. (2017). Alcohol use and risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. Neurology, 88(21), 2043-2051. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000003952

Alcohol use and risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. / Chen, Ching Jen; Brown, W. Mark; Moomaw, Charles J.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Osborne, Jennifer; Worrall, Bradford B.; Woo, Daniel; Koch, Sebastian.

In: Neurology, Vol. 88, No. 21, 23.05.2017, p. 2043-2051.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, CJ, Brown, WM, Moomaw, CJ, Langefeld, CD, Osborne, J, Worrall, BB, Woo, D & Koch, S 2017, 'Alcohol use and risk of intracerebral hemorrhage', Neurology, vol. 88, no. 21, pp. 2043-2051. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000003952
Chen CJ, Brown WM, Moomaw CJ, Langefeld CD, Osborne J, Worrall BB et al. Alcohol use and risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. Neurology. 2017 May 23;88(21):2043-2051. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000003952
Chen, Ching Jen ; Brown, W. Mark ; Moomaw, Charles J. ; Langefeld, Carl D. ; Osborne, Jennifer ; Worrall, Bradford B. ; Woo, Daniel ; Koch, Sebastian. / Alcohol use and risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. In: Neurology. 2017 ; Vol. 88, No. 21. pp. 2043-2051.
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abstract = "Objective: To analyze the dose-risk relationship for alcohol consumption and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in the Ethnic/Racial Variations of Intracerebral Hemorrhage (ERICH) study. Methods: ERICH is a multicenter, prospective, case-control study, designed to recruit 1,000 non-Hispanic white patients, 1,000 non-Hispanic black patients, and 1,000 Hispanic patients with ICH. Cases were matched 1:1 to ICH-free controls by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and geographic area. Comprehensive interviews included questions regarding alcohol consumption. Patterns of alcohol consumption were categorized as none, rare (<1 drink per month), moderate (≥1 drink per month and ≤2 drinks per day), intermediate (>2 drinks per day and <5 drinks per day), and heavy (≥5 drinks per day). ICH risk was calculated using the no-alcohol use category as the reference group. Results: Multivariable analyses demonstrated an ordinal trend for alcohol consumption: Rare (odds ratio [OR] 0.57, p < 0.0001), moderate (OR 0.65, p < 0.0001), intermediate (OR 0.82, p = 0.2666), and heavy alcohol consumption (OR 1.77, p = 0.0003). Subgroup analyses demonstrated an association of rare and moderate alcohol consumption with decreased risk of both lobar and nonlobar ICH. Heavy alcohol consumption demonstrated a strong association with increased nonlobar ICH risk (OR 2.04, p = 0.0003). Heavy alcohol consumption was associated with significant increase in nonlobar ICH risk in black (OR 2.34, p = 0.0140) and Hispanic participants (OR 12.32, p < 0.0001). A similar association was not found in white participants. Conclusions: This study demonstrated potential protective effects of rare and moderate alcohol consumption on ICH risk. Heavy alcohol consumption was associated with increased ICH risk. Race/ethnicity was a significant factor in alcohol-associated ICH risk; heavy alcohol consumption in black and Hispanic participants poses significant nonlobar ICH risk.",
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AU - Chen, Ching Jen

AU - Brown, W. Mark

AU - Moomaw, Charles J.

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AU - Worrall, Bradford B.

AU - Woo, Daniel

AU - Koch, Sebastian

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