Alcohol use and HIV disease management: The impact of individual and partner-level alcohol use among HIV-positive men who have sex with men

Sarah E. Woolf-King, Torsten B. Neilands, Samantha E. Dilworth, Adam Carrico, Mallory O. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Alcohol use among HIV-positive (HIV+) individuals is associated with decreased adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and consequently poorer HIV treatment outcomes. This study examined the independent association of individual and partner-level alcohol use with HIV disease management among men who have sex with men (MSM) in primary partnerships. In total, 356 HIV+ MSM and their male primary partners completed a baseline visit for a longitudinal study examining the role of couple-level factors in HIV treatment. The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) was administered to assess the individual and the partner-level alcohol use. Primary outcome variables included self-reported ART adherence, ART adherence self-efficacy, and HIV viral load. Results demonstrated that abstainers, compared to hazardous drinkers, had higher self-efficacy to integrate and persevere in HIV treatment and a lower odds of having a detectable viral load. Participants with a partner-abstainer, versus a partner-hazardous drinker, had less self-efficacy to persevere in HIV treatment, a lower odds of 100% three-day adherence and a higher viral load. Together, these findings suggest that assessment and treatment of both the patient's and the patient's primary partner's pattern of alcohol consumption is warranted when attempting to optimize HIV care among MSM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)702-708
Number of pages7
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 3 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Disease Management
alcohol
Alcohols
HIV
Disease
self-efficacy
management
Self Efficacy
Viral Load
alcohol consumption
longitudinal study
Therapeutics
Alcohol Drinking
Longitudinal Studies

Keywords

  • adherence
  • alcohol
  • ART
  • couples
  • treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Alcohol use and HIV disease management : The impact of individual and partner-level alcohol use among HIV-positive men who have sex with men. / Woolf-King, Sarah E.; Neilands, Torsten B.; Dilworth, Samantha E.; Carrico, Adam; Johnson, Mallory O.

In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV, Vol. 26, No. 6, 03.06.2014, p. 702-708.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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