Alcohol misuse, depressive symptoms, and HIV/STI risks of US Hispanic women

Brian McCabe, Natasha Solle, Nilda Peragallo Montano, Victoria Mitrani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Alcohol misuse and depressive symptoms have been linked to HIV/STI risk, but studies have rarely included Hispanic women, who have over four times greater HIV incidence than white, non-Hispanic women. Understanding the connections among alcohol misuse, depressive symptoms, and HIV/STI risks may suggest ways to meet specific needs of Hispanic women. This study’s objective is to examine the relationships among alcohol misuse, depressive symptoms, and seven HIV/STI risk factors. Design: Five hundred forty-eight US Hispanic women with intake data from a randomized trial were assessed for alcohol misuse (CAGE) and depressive symptoms (CES-D). GZLM and path analyses tested relationships between alcohol misuse or depressive symptoms and HIV/STI risk factors. Results: Self-efficacy and condom use were not related to alcohol misuse or depressive symptoms, but only 15% of women reported consistent condom use. After controlling for demographics, women with alcohol misuse had significantly more perceived HIV/STI risk (OR = 2.15) and better HIV/STI knowledge (β = −.54); and women with depressive symptoms had significantly more perceived HIV/STI risk (OR = 1.76) and worse HIV/STI knowledge (β = .37). Conclusions: Interventions to increase condom use for Hispanic women are needed, regardless of mental disorders. Working with Hispanic women with alcohol misuse or depressive symptoms presents a need (and opportunity) to address issues directly related to HIV/STI risk. Women’s health practitioners have an excellent opportunity to reach women by implementing regular screening programs in clinics that serve Hispanic women. For women with high depressive symptoms, poor HIV/STI knowledge should also be addressed. Future studies should test whether integrated and tailored risk reduction interventions affect these factors and lower HIV/STI risk for Hispanic women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalEthnicity and Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Oct 18 2016

Fingerprint

Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Hispanic Americans
alcohol
Alcohols
HIV
Depression
Condoms
Depressive Symptoms
Alcohol
AIDS/HIV
Women's Health
Self Efficacy
Risk Reduction Behavior
Mental Disorders
mental disorder
self-efficacy
incidence
Demography

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • depressive symptoms
  • Hispanics
  • HIV
  • women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Alcohol misuse, depressive symptoms, and HIV/STI risks of US Hispanic women. / McCabe, Brian; Solle, Natasha; Peragallo Montano, Nilda; Mitrani, Victoria.

In: Ethnicity and Health, 18.10.2016, p. 1-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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