Alcohol, ethnicity, and violence: The role of alcohol availability for Latino and black aggravated assaults and robberies

Amie L Nielsen, Ramiro Martinez, Matthew T. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article is one of the first to assess the impact of alcohol availability, an important but under-studied neighborhood element, and other social disorganization measures for Latino and black aggravated assault and robbery victimizations. Using data from Miami, Florida, for 1996 and 1997, we find that although most predictors have similar effects on the outcomes for both groups, higher alcohol availability rates are associated with more Latino but not black victims. To explain this finding, we relate the criminogenic influence of alcohol to contextual features of Latino and black neighborhoods, thereby integrating qualitative observations and quantitative data. Higher concentrations of recent immigrants are also related to fewer black assault victims, more Latino assault victims, but not to robberies for either group.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)479-502
Number of pages24
JournalSociological Quarterly
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2005

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assault
ethnicity
alcohol
violence
victimization
Group
immigrant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Alcohol, ethnicity, and violence : The role of alcohol availability for Latino and black aggravated assaults and robberies. / Nielsen, Amie L; Martinez, Ramiro; Lee, Matthew T.

In: Sociological Quarterly, Vol. 46, No. 3, 01.06.2005, p. 479-502.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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