Alcohol and Race/Ethnicity Elicit Different Changes in Lipid Profiles in HIV-Infected Individuals Receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

Maria J. Míguez-Burbano, John E. Lewis, Robert Malow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

This longitudinal study examined the impact of alcohol consumption (88 hazardous and 76 nonhazardous drinkers) and race/ethnicity on lipid profiles in individuals starting highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). At baseline, Whites and Hispanics had the most adverse lipid profiles, whereas Blacks had the least atherogenic. Whites and Hispanics showed higher increases in cholesterol (W = 11%; H = 6%), triglycerides (W = 40%; H = 24%), and low-density lipoprotein (10%) than Blacks (cholesterol = 4%; triglycerides = 9%; low-density lipoprotein = 4%). Hazardous alcohol consumption was correlated with increased lipids in each group. Hispanics had a clear trait risk for hypertriglyceridemia with HAART (1.9-fold) and with hazardous drinking (3.2-fold; p = .04). The highest risk for hypertriglyceridemia was found in heavy drinkers (3.75-fold; p = .05). Results underscore the importance of an alcohol/race interactive effect on HAART-associated dyslipidemia and the need for assessment and treatment of alcohol disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)176-183
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2009

Keywords

  • alcohol
  • antiretrovirals
  • cardiovascular disease
  • triglycerides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

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