Age Differences in the Trends of Smoking Among California Adults: Results from the California Health Interview Survey 2001–2012

Yue Pan, Weize Wang, Ke Sheng Wang, Kevin Moore, Erin Dunn, Shi Huang, Daniel J Feaster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim is to study the trends of cigarette smoking from 2001 to 2012 using a California representative sample in the US. Data was taken from the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) from 2001 to 2012, which is a population-based, biennial, random digit-dial telephone survey of the non-institutionalized population. The CHIS is the largest telephone survey in California and the largest state health survey in the US. 282,931 adults (n = 184,454 with age 18–60 and n = 98,477 with age >60) were included in the analysis. Data were weighted to be representative and adjusted for potential covariance and non-response biases. During 2001–2012, the prevalence of current smoking decreased from 18.86 to 15.4 % among adults age 18–60 (β = −0.8, p = 0.0041). As for adults age >60, the prevalence of current smoking trend decreased with variations, started from 9.66 % in 2001, slightly increased to 9.74 % in 2003, but then gradually decreased, falling to 8.18 % in 2012. In 2012, there was a 14 % reduction of daily smoking adults age 18–60 (OR 0.84, 95 % CI 0.76–0.93, p = 0.0006) compared to 2001, while no significant reduction of daily smoking was observed for those age >60. The reductions of smoking prevalence for adults younger than 60 are encouraging. However, there is a concern for smoking cessation rates among those older than 60 years of age, particularly for African Americans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1091-1098
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Community Health
Volume40
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

Fingerprint

age difference
Health Surveys
smoking
Smoking
Interviews
trend
interview
health
Telephone
telephone
Smoking Cessation
response behavior
African Americans
Population
Young Adult
young adult

Keywords

  • Age difference
  • California Health Interview Survey
  • Smoking trend

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Age Differences in the Trends of Smoking Among California Adults : Results from the California Health Interview Survey 2001–2012. / Pan, Yue; Wang, Weize; Wang, Ke Sheng; Moore, Kevin; Dunn, Erin; Huang, Shi; Feaster, Daniel J.

In: Journal of Community Health, Vol. 40, No. 6, 01.05.2015, p. 1091-1098.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pan, Yue ; Wang, Weize ; Wang, Ke Sheng ; Moore, Kevin ; Dunn, Erin ; Huang, Shi ; Feaster, Daniel J. / Age Differences in the Trends of Smoking Among California Adults : Results from the California Health Interview Survey 2001–2012. In: Journal of Community Health. 2015 ; Vol. 40, No. 6. pp. 1091-1098.
@article{a145cc7adec94cfba8130e7cf0ae1c8e,
title = "Age Differences in the Trends of Smoking Among California Adults: Results from the California Health Interview Survey 2001–2012",
abstract = "The aim is to study the trends of cigarette smoking from 2001 to 2012 using a California representative sample in the US. Data was taken from the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) from 2001 to 2012, which is a population-based, biennial, random digit-dial telephone survey of the non-institutionalized population. The CHIS is the largest telephone survey in California and the largest state health survey in the US. 282,931 adults (n = 184,454 with age 18–60 and n = 98,477 with age >60) were included in the analysis. Data were weighted to be representative and adjusted for potential covariance and non-response biases. During 2001–2012, the prevalence of current smoking decreased from 18.86 to 15.4 {\%} among adults age 18–60 (β = −0.8, p = 0.0041). As for adults age >60, the prevalence of current smoking trend decreased with variations, started from 9.66 {\%} in 2001, slightly increased to 9.74 {\%} in 2003, but then gradually decreased, falling to 8.18 {\%} in 2012. In 2012, there was a 14 {\%} reduction of daily smoking adults age 18–60 (OR 0.84, 95 {\%} CI 0.76–0.93, p = 0.0006) compared to 2001, while no significant reduction of daily smoking was observed for those age >60. The reductions of smoking prevalence for adults younger than 60 are encouraging. However, there is a concern for smoking cessation rates among those older than 60 years of age, particularly for African Americans.",
keywords = "Age difference, California Health Interview Survey, Smoking trend",
author = "Yue Pan and Weize Wang and Wang, {Ke Sheng} and Kevin Moore and Erin Dunn and Shi Huang and Feaster, {Daniel J}",
year = "2015",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10900-015-0034-0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "40",
pages = "1091--1098",
journal = "Journal of Community Health",
issn = "0094-5145",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Age Differences in the Trends of Smoking Among California Adults

T2 - Results from the California Health Interview Survey 2001–2012

AU - Pan, Yue

AU - Wang, Weize

AU - Wang, Ke Sheng

AU - Moore, Kevin

AU - Dunn, Erin

AU - Huang, Shi

AU - Feaster, Daniel J

PY - 2015/5/1

Y1 - 2015/5/1

N2 - The aim is to study the trends of cigarette smoking from 2001 to 2012 using a California representative sample in the US. Data was taken from the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) from 2001 to 2012, which is a population-based, biennial, random digit-dial telephone survey of the non-institutionalized population. The CHIS is the largest telephone survey in California and the largest state health survey in the US. 282,931 adults (n = 184,454 with age 18–60 and n = 98,477 with age >60) were included in the analysis. Data were weighted to be representative and adjusted for potential covariance and non-response biases. During 2001–2012, the prevalence of current smoking decreased from 18.86 to 15.4 % among adults age 18–60 (β = −0.8, p = 0.0041). As for adults age >60, the prevalence of current smoking trend decreased with variations, started from 9.66 % in 2001, slightly increased to 9.74 % in 2003, but then gradually decreased, falling to 8.18 % in 2012. In 2012, there was a 14 % reduction of daily smoking adults age 18–60 (OR 0.84, 95 % CI 0.76–0.93, p = 0.0006) compared to 2001, while no significant reduction of daily smoking was observed for those age >60. The reductions of smoking prevalence for adults younger than 60 are encouraging. However, there is a concern for smoking cessation rates among those older than 60 years of age, particularly for African Americans.

AB - The aim is to study the trends of cigarette smoking from 2001 to 2012 using a California representative sample in the US. Data was taken from the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) from 2001 to 2012, which is a population-based, biennial, random digit-dial telephone survey of the non-institutionalized population. The CHIS is the largest telephone survey in California and the largest state health survey in the US. 282,931 adults (n = 184,454 with age 18–60 and n = 98,477 with age >60) were included in the analysis. Data were weighted to be representative and adjusted for potential covariance and non-response biases. During 2001–2012, the prevalence of current smoking decreased from 18.86 to 15.4 % among adults age 18–60 (β = −0.8, p = 0.0041). As for adults age >60, the prevalence of current smoking trend decreased with variations, started from 9.66 % in 2001, slightly increased to 9.74 % in 2003, but then gradually decreased, falling to 8.18 % in 2012. In 2012, there was a 14 % reduction of daily smoking adults age 18–60 (OR 0.84, 95 % CI 0.76–0.93, p = 0.0006) compared to 2001, while no significant reduction of daily smoking was observed for those age >60. The reductions of smoking prevalence for adults younger than 60 are encouraging. However, there is a concern for smoking cessation rates among those older than 60 years of age, particularly for African Americans.

KW - Age difference

KW - California Health Interview Survey

KW - Smoking trend

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84945449540&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84945449540&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10900-015-0034-0

DO - 10.1007/s10900-015-0034-0

M3 - Article

C2 - 25929677

AN - SCOPUS:84945449540

VL - 40

SP - 1091

EP - 1098

JO - Journal of Community Health

JF - Journal of Community Health

SN - 0094-5145

IS - 6

ER -