Age Differences in the Trends of Smoking Among California Adults: Results from the California Health Interview Survey 2001–2012

Yue Pan, Weize Wang, Ke Sheng Wang, Kevin Moore, Erin Dunn, Shi Huang, Daniel J. Feaster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aim is to study the trends of cigarette smoking from 2001 to 2012 using a California representative sample in the US. Data was taken from the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) from 2001 to 2012, which is a population-based, biennial, random digit-dial telephone survey of the non-institutionalized population. The CHIS is the largest telephone survey in California and the largest state health survey in the US. 282,931 adults (n = 184,454 with age 18–60 and n = 98,477 with age >60) were included in the analysis. Data were weighted to be representative and adjusted for potential covariance and non-response biases. During 2001–2012, the prevalence of current smoking decreased from 18.86 to 15.4 % among adults age 18–60 (β = −0.8, p = 0.0041). As for adults age >60, the prevalence of current smoking trend decreased with variations, started from 9.66 % in 2001, slightly increased to 9.74 % in 2003, but then gradually decreased, falling to 8.18 % in 2012. In 2012, there was a 14 % reduction of daily smoking adults age 18–60 (OR 0.84, 95 % CI 0.76–0.93, p = 0.0006) compared to 2001, while no significant reduction of daily smoking was observed for those age >60. The reductions of smoking prevalence for adults younger than 60 are encouraging. However, there is a concern for smoking cessation rates among those older than 60 years of age, particularly for African Americans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1091-1098
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Community Health
Volume40
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Age difference
  • California Health Interview Survey
  • Smoking trend

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)

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