Age Differences in the Performance of Computer-Based Work

Sara J Czaja, Joseph Sharit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

141 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the extent to which age had an impact on the performance of computer-based work. Three simulated real-world computer-interactive tasks that varied in complexity and pacing requirements were evaluated. Ss included 65 women, ranging in age from 25 years to 70 years. The methodology encompassed physiological, subjective, and objective performance measures. The data indicated that previous computer experience and age had a significant impact on the performance of the 3 tasks. Increased age was associated with longer response times and a greater number of errors for all 3 tasks. Age also influenced perceptions of fatigue and task difficulty. The findings are discussed in terms of the implications for training and job design.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-67
Number of pages9
JournalPsychology and Aging
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1993

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Task Performance and Analysis
Reaction Time
Fatigue

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Social Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Age Differences in the Performance of Computer-Based Work. / Czaja, Sara J; Sharit, Joseph.

In: Psychology and Aging, Vol. 8, No. 1, 01.12.1993, p. 59-67.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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