African biomass burning is a substantial source of phosphorus deposition to the Amazon, Tropical Atlantic Ocean, and Southern Ocean

Anne E. Barkley, Joseph M. Prospero, Natalie Mahowald, Douglas S. Hamilton, Kim Popendorf, Amanda M. Oehlert, Ali Pourmand, Alexandre Gatineau, Kathy Panechou-Pulcherie, Patricia Blackwelder, Cassandra Gaston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The deposition of phosphorus (P) from African dust is believed to play an important role in bolstering primary productivity in the Amazon Basin and Tropical Atlantic Ocean (TAO), leading to sequestration of carbon dioxide. However, there are few measurements of African dust in South America that can robustly test this hypothesis and even fewer measurements of soluble P, which is readily available for stimulating primary production in the ocean. To test this hypothesis, we measured total and soluble P in long-range transported aerosols collected in Cayenne, French Guiana, a TAO coastal site located at the northeastern edge of the Amazon. Our measurements confirm that in boreal spring when African dust transport is greatest, dust supplies the majority of P, of which 5% is soluble. In boreal fall, when dust transport is at an annual minimum, we measured unexpectedly high concentrations of soluble P, which we show is associated with the transport of biomass burning (BB) from southern Africa. Integrating our results into a chemical transport model, we show that African BB supplies up to half of the P deposited annually to the Amazon from transported African aerosol. This observational study links P-rich BB aerosols from Africa to enhanced P deposition in the Amazon. Contrary to current thought, we also show that African BB is a more important source of soluble P than dust to the TAO and oceans in the Southern Hemisphere and may be more important for marine productivity, particularly in boreal summer and fall.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16216-16221
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume116
Issue number33
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 13 2019

Fingerprint

Atlantic Ocean
Dust
Oceans and Seas
Biomass
Phosphorus
Aerosols
French Guiana
Chemical Models
Southern Africa
Capsicum
South America
Carbon Dioxide
Observational Studies

Keywords

  • Amazon Basin
  • Atlantic Ocean
  • Biomass burning
  • Dust
  • Phosphorus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

African biomass burning is a substantial source of phosphorus deposition to the Amazon, Tropical Atlantic Ocean, and Southern Ocean. / Barkley, Anne E.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Mahowald, Natalie; Hamilton, Douglas S.; Popendorf, Kim; Oehlert, Amanda M.; Pourmand, Ali; Gatineau, Alexandre; Panechou-Pulcherie, Kathy; Blackwelder, Patricia; Gaston, Cassandra.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 116, No. 33, 13.08.2019, p. 16216-16221.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barkley, Anne E. ; Prospero, Joseph M. ; Mahowald, Natalie ; Hamilton, Douglas S. ; Popendorf, Kim ; Oehlert, Amanda M. ; Pourmand, Ali ; Gatineau, Alexandre ; Panechou-Pulcherie, Kathy ; Blackwelder, Patricia ; Gaston, Cassandra. / African biomass burning is a substantial source of phosphorus deposition to the Amazon, Tropical Atlantic Ocean, and Southern Ocean. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2019 ; Vol. 116, No. 33. pp. 16216-16221.
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