African Americans' knowledge about organ donation

Closing the gap with more effective persuasive message strategies

Susan Morgan, Thomas Cannon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In spite of increasing interest in the area of African Americans' willingness to donate organs, little empirical knowledge exists that can be used to create more effective public communication campaigns. In this study, 310 African Americans responded to seven knowledge items (based on myths and misconceptions about organ donation) shown in past studies to discriminate between donors and nondonors. The rate of accurate responses varied from 33% to 78% to individual knowledge items. Beliefs that the organ allocation system is inequitable (favoring whites and the rich) and the belief that donors pay extra medical bills strongly distinguished donors from non-donors. In addition, the information sources reported by African Americans willing to donate were more likely to include family members. Implications of these findings to the development of more effective organ donation campaigns targeting African Americans are offered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1066-1071
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume95
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tissue and Organ Procurement
African Americans
Tissue Donors
Communication

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Medical mistrust
  • Organ donation
  • Organ donation model
  • Religiosity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

African Americans' knowledge about organ donation : Closing the gap with more effective persuasive message strategies. / Morgan, Susan; Cannon, Thomas.

In: Journal of the National Medical Association, Vol. 95, No. 11, 11.2003, p. 1066-1071.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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