Affective correlates of stimulant use and adherence to anti-retroviral therapy among HIV-positive methamphetamine users

Adam W. Carrico, Mallory O. Johnson, Grant N. Colfax, Judith Tedlie Moskowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

The use of stimulants has important implications for HIV prevention and care. However, few investigations have examined psychological correlates of substance use and adherence to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) among HIV-positive stimulant users. This crosssectional investigation examined affective correlates of stimulant use and ART adherence among HIV-positive methamphetamine users. In total, 122 HIV-positive men who have sex with men or transgendered individuals on ART who reported using methamphetamine in the past 30 days were recruited from the community. HIV-specific traumatic stress was consistently and independently associated with more frequent cocaine/crack use (but not with methamphetamine use). Positive affect was independently associated with a decreased likelihood of reporting any injection drug use and an increased likelihood of reporting perfect ART adherence. HIV-specific traumatic stress may be an important determinant of increased cocaine/crack use in this population. Positive affect may increase the likelihood that individuals will refrain from injection drug use and achieve high levels of ART adherence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)769-777
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2010

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Keywords

  • Cocaine
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Methamphetamine
  • Positive affect
  • Self medication hypothesis
  • Trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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