Adverse effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in antihypertensive therapy with focus on quinapril

Barry J. Materson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are useful first-line drugs in the therapy of mild and moderate hypertension. Adverse reactions to this drug class are rarely serious. Hypotension, cough, rash, and taste disturbance are uncommon; reduced glomerular filtration and hyperkalemia occur infrequently; angioedema is rare and neutropenia is extremely rare. Quinapril is a new ACE inhibitor that is converted to biologically active quinaprilat in the liver. This ACE inhibitor has a rapid onset of action and inhibits local tissue converting enzyme systems in kidney, heart, and brain, as well as in the circulating renin-angiotensin system. Clinically significant adverse effects of quinapril occur at low rates. In 1,771 patients receiving quinapril, the reported incidence of the first occurrence of orthostatic hypotension was comparable to that seen in patients receiving placebo. In other studies, headache was reported by up to 4.7% of patients receiving quinapril, which is comparable to reported incidences of headache in patients receiving other ACE inhibitors. Other adverse events reported at rates >1% include cough with associated rhinitis and bronchitis, dizziness, and somnolence. Such adverse events have only rarely led to the withdrawal of patients from clinical studies of quinapril.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)C46-C53
JournalThe American Journal of Cardiology
Volume69
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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