Adverse Childhood Experiences and Depressive Symptoms among Young Adult Hispanic Immigrants: Moderating and Mediating Effects of Distinct Facets of Acculturation Stress

Lilian G. Bravo, Gabriela A. Nagy, Allison Mc Cord Stafford, Brian E. McCabe, Rosa Gonzalez-Guarda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Hispanic immigrants experience more adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and depressive symptom chronicity/severity than non-Hispanic peers. Acculturation stress relates to both depressive symptoms and ACEs, but the mechanism is not well-understood. We conducted a secondary data analysis of baseline data, from an ongoing longitudinal study to test theoretically-based mediating and moderating effects of acculturation stress on the relationship between ACEs and depression in a sample of young adult Hispanic immigrants (N = 391). Results indicated ACEs predicted depressive symptoms. Mediation and moderation effects were significant for cumulative and distinct facets of acculturation stress. Implications for mental health nurses are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalIssues in Mental Health Nursing
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health

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