Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma can be indistinguishable from other more common T-cell lymphomas. The University of Miami experience with a large cohort of cases

Mahsa Khanlari, Juan Carlos Ramos, Sandra Patricia Sanchez, Jeong Hee Cho, Alexandra Amador, German Campuzano-Zuluaga, Francisco Vega, Jennifer Chapman-Fredricks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, an aggressive T-cell neoplasm, is causally linked to human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and based on this association has a distinct geographic distribution. In our United States-based practice, whose population is enriched for immigrants from human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 endemic areas, we have identified that a subset of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, in the absence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 identification, are indistinguishable from other more common T-cell neoplasms. We retrospectively gathered serology results for anti-human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1/2 antibody in patients diagnosed with T-cell neoplasms at our institution. A total of 220 human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1/2 positive patients with T-cell neoplasms were identified; 199 (91%) were correctly classified as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma or provisionally as peripheral T-cell lymphoma (serology testing pending). Twenty-one cases (9%) were initially misclassified, including the following: 13 presenting with skin +/− peripheral blood involvement and misclassified as mycosis fungoides/Sezary syndrome; 7 with lymphomatous disease, absence of leukemic involvement, and diffuse CD30 expression, misclassified as ALK- negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma; 1 thought to represent T-prolymphocytic leukemia with TCL-1 gene rearrangement and diffuse marrow involvement. We also present an example of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, which mimicked lymphoepithelioid variant of peripheral T-cell lymphoma also with diffuse marrow involvement. A subset of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma can closely mimic a variety of other more common T-cell neoplasms. Due to its extreme clinicopathologic heterogeneity, identification of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma requires a high level of suspicion based on patient demographic alone, which should prompt anti-human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1/2 serology testing in all T-cell neoplasms developing in patients of appropriate demographic. Absence of high level of suspicion, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is easily misclassified.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-18
Number of pages18
JournalModern Pathology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 15 2018

Fingerprint

Adult T Cell Leukemia Lymphoma
T-Cell Lymphoma
T-Lymphocytes
Human T-lymphotropic virus 1
Serology
Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma
Neoplasms
Prolymphocytic Leukemia
Bone Marrow
Demography
Sezary Syndrome
Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma
Mycosis Fungoides
Gene Rearrangement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

@article{d4d7ed5ef8454a5ca6176ba7ba75d352,
title = "Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma can be indistinguishable from other more common T-cell lymphomas. The University of Miami experience with a large cohort of cases",
abstract = "Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, an aggressive T-cell neoplasm, is causally linked to human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and based on this association has a distinct geographic distribution. In our United States-based practice, whose population is enriched for immigrants from human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 endemic areas, we have identified that a subset of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, in the absence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 identification, are indistinguishable from other more common T-cell neoplasms. We retrospectively gathered serology results for anti-human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1/2 antibody in patients diagnosed with T-cell neoplasms at our institution. A total of 220 human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1/2 positive patients with T-cell neoplasms were identified; 199 (91{\%}) were correctly classified as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma or provisionally as peripheral T-cell lymphoma (serology testing pending). Twenty-one cases (9{\%}) were initially misclassified, including the following: 13 presenting with skin +/− peripheral blood involvement and misclassified as mycosis fungoides/Sezary syndrome; 7 with lymphomatous disease, absence of leukemic involvement, and diffuse CD30 expression, misclassified as ALK- negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma; 1 thought to represent T-prolymphocytic leukemia with TCL-1 gene rearrangement and diffuse marrow involvement. We also present an example of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, which mimicked lymphoepithelioid variant of peripheral T-cell lymphoma also with diffuse marrow involvement. A subset of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma can closely mimic a variety of other more common T-cell neoplasms. Due to its extreme clinicopathologic heterogeneity, identification of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma requires a high level of suspicion based on patient demographic alone, which should prompt anti-human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1/2 serology testing in all T-cell neoplasms developing in patients of appropriate demographic. Absence of high level of suspicion, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is easily misclassified.",
author = "Mahsa Khanlari and {Carlos Ramos}, Juan and Sanchez, {Sandra Patricia} and Cho, {Jeong Hee} and Alexandra Amador and German Campuzano-Zuluaga and Francisco Vega and Jennifer Chapman-Fredricks",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1038/s41379-018-0037-3",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--18",
journal = "Modern Pathology",
issn = "0893-3952",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma can be indistinguishable from other more common T-cell lymphomas. The University of Miami experience with a large cohort of cases

AU - Khanlari, Mahsa

AU - Carlos Ramos, Juan

AU - Sanchez, Sandra Patricia

AU - Cho, Jeong Hee

AU - Amador, Alexandra

AU - Campuzano-Zuluaga, German

AU - Vega, Francisco

AU - Chapman-Fredricks, Jennifer

PY - 2018/2/15

Y1 - 2018/2/15

N2 - Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, an aggressive T-cell neoplasm, is causally linked to human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and based on this association has a distinct geographic distribution. In our United States-based practice, whose population is enriched for immigrants from human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 endemic areas, we have identified that a subset of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, in the absence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 identification, are indistinguishable from other more common T-cell neoplasms. We retrospectively gathered serology results for anti-human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1/2 antibody in patients diagnosed with T-cell neoplasms at our institution. A total of 220 human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1/2 positive patients with T-cell neoplasms were identified; 199 (91%) were correctly classified as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma or provisionally as peripheral T-cell lymphoma (serology testing pending). Twenty-one cases (9%) were initially misclassified, including the following: 13 presenting with skin +/− peripheral blood involvement and misclassified as mycosis fungoides/Sezary syndrome; 7 with lymphomatous disease, absence of leukemic involvement, and diffuse CD30 expression, misclassified as ALK- negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma; 1 thought to represent T-prolymphocytic leukemia with TCL-1 gene rearrangement and diffuse marrow involvement. We also present an example of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, which mimicked lymphoepithelioid variant of peripheral T-cell lymphoma also with diffuse marrow involvement. A subset of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma can closely mimic a variety of other more common T-cell neoplasms. Due to its extreme clinicopathologic heterogeneity, identification of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma requires a high level of suspicion based on patient demographic alone, which should prompt anti-human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1/2 serology testing in all T-cell neoplasms developing in patients of appropriate demographic. Absence of high level of suspicion, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is easily misclassified.

AB - Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, an aggressive T-cell neoplasm, is causally linked to human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and based on this association has a distinct geographic distribution. In our United States-based practice, whose population is enriched for immigrants from human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 endemic areas, we have identified that a subset of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, in the absence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 identification, are indistinguishable from other more common T-cell neoplasms. We retrospectively gathered serology results for anti-human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1/2 antibody in patients diagnosed with T-cell neoplasms at our institution. A total of 220 human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1/2 positive patients with T-cell neoplasms were identified; 199 (91%) were correctly classified as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma or provisionally as peripheral T-cell lymphoma (serology testing pending). Twenty-one cases (9%) were initially misclassified, including the following: 13 presenting with skin +/− peripheral blood involvement and misclassified as mycosis fungoides/Sezary syndrome; 7 with lymphomatous disease, absence of leukemic involvement, and diffuse CD30 expression, misclassified as ALK- negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma; 1 thought to represent T-prolymphocytic leukemia with TCL-1 gene rearrangement and diffuse marrow involvement. We also present an example of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, which mimicked lymphoepithelioid variant of peripheral T-cell lymphoma also with diffuse marrow involvement. A subset of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma can closely mimic a variety of other more common T-cell neoplasms. Due to its extreme clinicopathologic heterogeneity, identification of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma requires a high level of suspicion based on patient demographic alone, which should prompt anti-human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1/2 serology testing in all T-cell neoplasms developing in patients of appropriate demographic. Absence of high level of suspicion, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is easily misclassified.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85042066870&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85042066870&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/s41379-018-0037-3

DO - 10.1038/s41379-018-0037-3

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 18

JO - Modern Pathology

JF - Modern Pathology

SN - 0893-3952

ER -