Acute stroke in a metropolitan area 1970 and 1980. The Minnesota heart survey

Richard F. Gillum, Orlando W Gomez-Marin, Thomas E. Kottke, David R. Jacobs, Ronald J. Prineas, Aaron R. Folsom, Russell V. Luepker, Henry Blackburn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mortality rates for stroke, and hospitalization and case fatality rates for acute stroke in 1970 and 1980 were obtained for residents aged 30-74 of the Twin Cities (Minneapolis-St Paul) metropolitan area to determine whether improved hospital care contributed to the decline in stroke mortality. Age-adjusted mortality rates per 100,000 declined significantly in that decade for men (1970, 89.4; 1980, 47.5; p < 0.01) and women (1970, 72.6; 1980, 40.9; p < 0.01). Age-adjusted hospitalization rates per 100,000 population also declined significantly for men (1970, 438; 1980, 323; p < 0.01) and women (1970, 331; 1980, 203; p < 0.01). Age-adjusted mean length of hospital stay did not change significantly. Hospital case fatality declined for men aged 30-64 years (1970, 22.5%; 1980, 15.1%; p < 0.01) but did not change significantly for 65 to 74 year-old men (1970, 16.5%; 1980, 20.0%; p = 0.09) or for all women (age-adjusted rates: 1970, 13.6%; 1980, 16.0%; p = 0.17). There was no change in the distribution of severity of hospitalized cases between years. Therefore, the decline in stroke mortality is consistent with a decreased incidence of stroke resulting from improved hypertension control. Improvements in hospital medical care appear not to have contributed substantially to the decline in stroke mortality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)891-898
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Chronic Diseases
Volume38
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1985
Externally publishedYes

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Stroke
Mortality
Length of Stay
Hospitalization
Surveys and Questionnaires
Hypertension
Incidence
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Gillum, R. F., Gomez-Marin, O. W., Kottke, T. E., Jacobs, D. R., Prineas, R. J., Folsom, A. R., ... Blackburn, H. (1985). Acute stroke in a metropolitan area 1970 and 1980. The Minnesota heart survey. Journal of Chronic Diseases, 38(11), 891-898. https://doi.org/10.1016/0021-9681(85)90124-9

Acute stroke in a metropolitan area 1970 and 1980. The Minnesota heart survey. / Gillum, Richard F.; Gomez-Marin, Orlando W; Kottke, Thomas E.; Jacobs, David R.; Prineas, Ronald J.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Luepker, Russell V.; Blackburn, Henry.

In: Journal of Chronic Diseases, Vol. 38, No. 11, 01.01.1985, p. 891-898.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gillum, RF, Gomez-Marin, OW, Kottke, TE, Jacobs, DR, Prineas, RJ, Folsom, AR, Luepker, RV & Blackburn, H 1985, 'Acute stroke in a metropolitan area 1970 and 1980. The Minnesota heart survey', Journal of Chronic Diseases, vol. 38, no. 11, pp. 891-898. https://doi.org/10.1016/0021-9681(85)90124-9
Gillum RF, Gomez-Marin OW, Kottke TE, Jacobs DR, Prineas RJ, Folsom AR et al. Acute stroke in a metropolitan area 1970 and 1980. The Minnesota heart survey. Journal of Chronic Diseases. 1985 Jan 1;38(11):891-898. https://doi.org/10.1016/0021-9681(85)90124-9
Gillum, Richard F. ; Gomez-Marin, Orlando W ; Kottke, Thomas E. ; Jacobs, David R. ; Prineas, Ronald J. ; Folsom, Aaron R. ; Luepker, Russell V. ; Blackburn, Henry. / Acute stroke in a metropolitan area 1970 and 1980. The Minnesota heart survey. In: Journal of Chronic Diseases. 1985 ; Vol. 38, No. 11. pp. 891-898.
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