Acupressure versus intravenous metoclopramide to prevent nausea and vomiting during spinal anesthesia for cesarean section

Deborah J. Stein, David J. Birnbach, Brett I. Danzer, Maxine M. Kuroda, Amos Grunebaum, Daniel M. Thys

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

104 Scopus citations

Abstract

Nausea and vomiting occur frequently during cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. Metoclopramide reduces intraoperative nausea and vomiting, but not without potential side effects. Acupressure, a noninvasive variation of acupuncture that involves constant pressure on the wrist, has been suggested as an alternative method to prevent nausea and vomiting. The aim of this study was to compare acupressure and intravenous (IV) metoclopramide for the prevention of nausea and vomiting during elective cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. Seventy-five patients were studied in a randomized, prospective, double-blind comparative trial. Group I patients received acupressure bands + 2 mL IV saline, Group II patients received placebo wrist bands + 10 mg IV metoclopramide, and Group III patients received placebo wrist bands + 2 ml, IV saline. Patients who received either acupressure or metoclopramide prior to initiation of spinal anesthesia for cesarean section had much less nausea than patients in the placebo group. Acupressure is an effective, non-pharmacologic method to reduce intraoperative nausea during elective cesarean section in the awake patient.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)342-345
Number of pages4
JournalAnesthesia and analgesia
Volume84
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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