Actual versus self-reported scholastic achievement of litigating postconcussion and severe closed head injury claimants

M. Frank Greiffenstein, W. John Baker, Douglas E Johnson-Greene

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Psychologists typically rely on patients' self-report of premorbid status in litigated settings. The authors examined the fidelity between self-reported and actual scholastic performance in litigating head injury claimants. The data indicated late postconcussion syndrome (LPCS) and severe closed head injury litigants retrospectively inflated scholastic performance to a greater degree than nonlitigating control groups. The LPCS group showed the highest magnitude of grade inflation, but discrepancy scores did not significantly correlate with a battery of malingering measures or with objective cerebral dysfunction. These findings support previous studies, which showed self-report is not a reliable basis for estimation of preinjury cognitive status. Retrospective inflation may represent a response shift bias shaped by an adversarial context rather than a form of malingering.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)202-208
Number of pages7
JournalPsychological Assessment
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Malingering
Closed Head Injuries
Economic Inflation
Self Report
Craniocerebral Trauma
Psychology
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Actual versus self-reported scholastic achievement of litigating postconcussion and severe closed head injury claimants. / Greiffenstein, M. Frank; John Baker, W.; Johnson-Greene, Douglas E.

In: Psychological Assessment, Vol. 14, No. 2, 01.06.2002, p. 202-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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