Active confrontational coping predicts decreased clinical progression over a one-year period in HIV-infected homosexual men

C. L. Mulder, M. H. Antoni, H. J. Duivenvoorden, R. H. Kauffmann, K. Goodkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Scopus citations

Abstract

The associations between stressful life events, psychiatric symptoms, coping, and social support and HIV disease progression one year later were studied in 51 HIV-infected asymptomatic and early symptomatic homosexual men. Dependent variables were CD4 counts and clinical progression. No associations between the psychosocial parameters and CD4 counts were found. Active confrontation with HIV infection as a coping strategy was predictive of decreased clinical progression at one year follow-up, after taking into account baseline biomedical and behavioral variables. These results show that active coping strategies may have an effect on disease progression, possibly mediated by greater compliance with medical treatments or by psychoneuroimmunological mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)957-965
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Psychosomatic Research
Volume39
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1995

Keywords

  • Coping
  • HIV infection
  • Homosexuality
  • Psychoneuroimmunology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Psychology(all)

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