Acetylcholinesterase biosynthesis and transport in tissue culture

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The enzyme acetylcholinesterase consists of a family of molecular forms differing in subunit composition, solubility properties, and subcellular location. The use of a variety of reversible or irreversible active site- directed ligands with different membrane permeability properties permits the selective inactivation of separate pools of enzyme molecules. The application of these inhibitors together with standard biochemical techniques has permitted a detailed characterization of the synthesis and metabolism of the secretory and membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase in tissue-cultured cells. These techniques, with minor modifications and appropriate controls, can also be applied to the study of AChE metabolism in organ culture and in vivo.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)353-367
Number of pages15
JournalMethods in Enzymology
VolumeVOL. 96
StatePublished - Dec 1 1983
Externally publishedYes

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Tissue culture
Biosynthesis
Acetylcholinesterase
Metabolism
Membranes
Organ Culture Techniques
Enzymes
Solubility
Cultured Cells
Permeability
Catalytic Domain
Cells
Tissue
Ligands
Molecules
Chemical analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Acetylcholinesterase biosynthesis and transport in tissue culture. / Rotundo, Richard L.

In: Methods in Enzymology, Vol. VOL. 96, 01.12.1983, p. 353-367.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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