Accuracy of self-reported smoking and secondhand smoke exposure in the US workforce: The national health and nutrition examination surveys

Kristopher Arheart, David J Lee, Lora E. Fleming, William G. LeBlanc, Noella Dietz, Kathryn McCollister, James D. Wilkinson, John E Lewis, John D. Clark, Evelyn P. Davila, Frank C. Bandiera, Michael J. Erard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Occupational health studies often rely on self-reported secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure. This study examines the accuracy of self-reported tobacco use and SHS exposure. METHODS: Data on serum cotinine, self-reported tobacco use, and SHS exposure for US workers were extracted from three National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (n = 17,011). Serum cotinine levels were used to classify workers into SHS exposure categories. The percent agreement between self-reported tobacco use and SHS exposure with the cotinine categories was calculated. RESULTS: Workers reporting tobacco use were 88% accurate whereas workers reporting work, home, or home+work exposures were 87% to 92% accurate. Workers reporting no SHS exposure were only 28% accurate. CONCLUSIONS: Workers accurately reported their smoking status and workplace-home SHS exposures, but substantial numbers reporting "no exposures" had detectable levels of cotinine in their blood, indicating exposure to SHS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1414-1420
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume50
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008

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Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Nutrition Surveys
Smoking
Cotinine
Tobacco Use
Occupational Health
Serum
Workplace

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Accuracy of self-reported smoking and secondhand smoke exposure in the US workforce : The national health and nutrition examination surveys. / Arheart, Kristopher; Lee, David J; Fleming, Lora E.; LeBlanc, William G.; Dietz, Noella; McCollister, Kathryn; Wilkinson, James D.; Lewis, John E; Clark, John D.; Davila, Evelyn P.; Bandiera, Frank C.; Erard, Michael J.

In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 50, No. 12, 01.12.2008, p. 1414-1420.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Arheart, Kristopher ; Lee, David J ; Fleming, Lora E. ; LeBlanc, William G. ; Dietz, Noella ; McCollister, Kathryn ; Wilkinson, James D. ; Lewis, John E ; Clark, John D. ; Davila, Evelyn P. ; Bandiera, Frank C. ; Erard, Michael J. / Accuracy of self-reported smoking and secondhand smoke exposure in the US workforce : The national health and nutrition examination surveys. In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 50, No. 12. pp. 1414-1420.
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