Acculturation styles and their associations with psychiatric symptoms and quality of life in ethnic minorities with schizophrenia

Amy G Weisman, Marc J. Weintraub, Jessica Maura, Ana Martinez de Andino, Caitlin A. Brown, Kayla Gurak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined whether Berry's model of acculturative stress would predict psychiatric symptom severity and quality of life (QoL) in ethnic minorities with schizophrenia. Tested extensively in non-psychiatric populations, Berry's framework generally suggests that integration, or engagement with both the host and minority culture, is most adaptive. Using the Abbreviated Multidimensional Acculturation Scale (AMAS), we tested the hypothesis that individuals with schizophrenia who employed an integrative acculturation strategy would have the highest QoL and lowest symptom severity, followed by the assimilation and enculturation groups, then the marginalized group. Psychiatric symptoms and QoL were regressed on AMAS assimilation scores, enculturation scores, and the interaction term in a sample of 128 Hispanic and Blacks with schizophrenia (M age = 41.28; 70% male). Acculturation strategy was not found to relate to psychiatric symptoms (measured from the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale). However, acculturation strategy did predict QoL (measured from the Quality of Life Inventory), and results were in line with Berry's model. Marginalization may exacerbate issues surrounding social identity in schizophrenia, including low self-concept clarity and internalized stigma. Encouraging bicultural individuals with schizophrenia to interact with the host culture while also practicing traditions from their minority culture may help improve their quality of life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)418-423
Number of pages6
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume255
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

Fingerprint

Acculturation
Psychiatry
Schizophrenia
Quality of Life
Fruit
Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale
Social Identification
Hispanic Americans
Self Concept
Equipment and Supplies
Population

Keywords

  • Acculturative stress
  • Culture
  • Enculturation
  • Marginalization
  • Psychosis
  • Serious mental illness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Acculturation styles and their associations with psychiatric symptoms and quality of life in ethnic minorities with schizophrenia. / Weisman, Amy G; Weintraub, Marc J.; Maura, Jessica; Martinez de Andino, Ana; Brown, Caitlin A.; Gurak, Kayla.

In: Psychiatry Research, Vol. 255, 01.09.2017, p. 418-423.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weisman, Amy G ; Weintraub, Marc J. ; Maura, Jessica ; Martinez de Andino, Ana ; Brown, Caitlin A. ; Gurak, Kayla. / Acculturation styles and their associations with psychiatric symptoms and quality of life in ethnic minorities with schizophrenia. In: Psychiatry Research. 2017 ; Vol. 255. pp. 418-423.
@article{db2d2e0eca134ba98a47fddf762e6447,
title = "Acculturation styles and their associations with psychiatric symptoms and quality of life in ethnic minorities with schizophrenia",
abstract = "This study examined whether Berry's model of acculturative stress would predict psychiatric symptom severity and quality of life (QoL) in ethnic minorities with schizophrenia. Tested extensively in non-psychiatric populations, Berry's framework generally suggests that integration, or engagement with both the host and minority culture, is most adaptive. Using the Abbreviated Multidimensional Acculturation Scale (AMAS), we tested the hypothesis that individuals with schizophrenia who employed an integrative acculturation strategy would have the highest QoL and lowest symptom severity, followed by the assimilation and enculturation groups, then the marginalized group. Psychiatric symptoms and QoL were regressed on AMAS assimilation scores, enculturation scores, and the interaction term in a sample of 128 Hispanic and Blacks with schizophrenia (M age = 41.28; 70{\%} male). Acculturation strategy was not found to relate to psychiatric symptoms (measured from the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale). However, acculturation strategy did predict QoL (measured from the Quality of Life Inventory), and results were in line with Berry's model. Marginalization may exacerbate issues surrounding social identity in schizophrenia, including low self-concept clarity and internalized stigma. Encouraging bicultural individuals with schizophrenia to interact with the host culture while also practicing traditions from their minority culture may help improve their quality of life.",
keywords = "Acculturative stress, Culture, Enculturation, Marginalization, Psychosis, Serious mental illness",
author = "Weisman, {Amy G} and Weintraub, {Marc J.} and Jessica Maura and {Martinez de Andino}, Ana and Brown, {Caitlin A.} and Kayla Gurak",
year = "2017",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.psychres.2017.06.074",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "255",
pages = "418--423",
journal = "Psychiatry Research",
issn = "0165-1781",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acculturation styles and their associations with psychiatric symptoms and quality of life in ethnic minorities with schizophrenia

AU - Weisman, Amy G

AU - Weintraub, Marc J.

AU - Maura, Jessica

AU - Martinez de Andino, Ana

AU - Brown, Caitlin A.

AU - Gurak, Kayla

PY - 2017/9/1

Y1 - 2017/9/1

N2 - This study examined whether Berry's model of acculturative stress would predict psychiatric symptom severity and quality of life (QoL) in ethnic minorities with schizophrenia. Tested extensively in non-psychiatric populations, Berry's framework generally suggests that integration, or engagement with both the host and minority culture, is most adaptive. Using the Abbreviated Multidimensional Acculturation Scale (AMAS), we tested the hypothesis that individuals with schizophrenia who employed an integrative acculturation strategy would have the highest QoL and lowest symptom severity, followed by the assimilation and enculturation groups, then the marginalized group. Psychiatric symptoms and QoL were regressed on AMAS assimilation scores, enculturation scores, and the interaction term in a sample of 128 Hispanic and Blacks with schizophrenia (M age = 41.28; 70% male). Acculturation strategy was not found to relate to psychiatric symptoms (measured from the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale). However, acculturation strategy did predict QoL (measured from the Quality of Life Inventory), and results were in line with Berry's model. Marginalization may exacerbate issues surrounding social identity in schizophrenia, including low self-concept clarity and internalized stigma. Encouraging bicultural individuals with schizophrenia to interact with the host culture while also practicing traditions from their minority culture may help improve their quality of life.

AB - This study examined whether Berry's model of acculturative stress would predict psychiatric symptom severity and quality of life (QoL) in ethnic minorities with schizophrenia. Tested extensively in non-psychiatric populations, Berry's framework generally suggests that integration, or engagement with both the host and minority culture, is most adaptive. Using the Abbreviated Multidimensional Acculturation Scale (AMAS), we tested the hypothesis that individuals with schizophrenia who employed an integrative acculturation strategy would have the highest QoL and lowest symptom severity, followed by the assimilation and enculturation groups, then the marginalized group. Psychiatric symptoms and QoL were regressed on AMAS assimilation scores, enculturation scores, and the interaction term in a sample of 128 Hispanic and Blacks with schizophrenia (M age = 41.28; 70% male). Acculturation strategy was not found to relate to psychiatric symptoms (measured from the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale). However, acculturation strategy did predict QoL (measured from the Quality of Life Inventory), and results were in line with Berry's model. Marginalization may exacerbate issues surrounding social identity in schizophrenia, including low self-concept clarity and internalized stigma. Encouraging bicultural individuals with schizophrenia to interact with the host culture while also practicing traditions from their minority culture may help improve their quality of life.

KW - Acculturative stress

KW - Culture

KW - Enculturation

KW - Marginalization

KW - Psychosis

KW - Serious mental illness

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85021456768&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85021456768&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.06.074

DO - 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.06.074

M3 - Article

C2 - 28672225

AN - SCOPUS:85021456768

VL - 255

SP - 418

EP - 423

JO - Psychiatry Research

JF - Psychiatry Research

SN - 0165-1781

ER -