Acculturation Stress, Age at Immigration, and Employment Status as Predictors of Sleep Among Latinx Immigrants

Chanel Zhan, Gabriela A. Nagy, Jade Q. Wu, Brian McCabe, Allison M. Stafford, Rosa Gonzalez-Guarda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Sleep is important for physical and mental health. Latinx individuals are thought to experience worse sleep and associated health outcomes, resulting in health disparities. There is a dearth of research on the factors (e.g., employment status, age at immigration) that predict poor sleep among Latinx immigrants. The present study aimed to (1) examine the link between demographic factors, immigration-related factors, and acculturation stress, and sleep, and (2) identify factors that either attenuate or intensify the link between acculturation stress and sleep among Latinx immigrants in the US South, an immigrant-hostile area that is home to an increasing Latinx population that remains understudied. Hierarchical regressions were used to analyze data from 391 Latinx adult immigrants, examining the link between demographic factors, immigration-related factors, acculturation stress, and two sleep variables (sleep quality, difficulty falling asleep). Employment status and age at immigration were examined as moderators of the link between acculturation stress and sleep. Data were collected through in-person surveys. Regressions showed that acculturation stress was significantly linked to worse sleep quality (β = 0.30, p = 0.001) and more difficulty falling asleep (β = 0.41, p < 0.001), while controlling for participant characteristics. Younger age at immigration (β = − 0.14, p = 0.005) and being unemployed (β = − 0.13, p = 0.006) were associated with more difficulty falling asleep. Age at immigration intensified the relationship between acculturation stress and sleep quality (β = 0.14, p = 0.005), difficulty falling asleep (β = 0.15, p = 0.002). Reducing acculturation stress is a meaningful intervention focus, with important implications for sleep health, particularly for recent Latinx immigrants. Age at immigration and employment status are also important factors to consider when designing targeted interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acculturation stress
  • Insomnia
  • Latinx immigrants
  • Sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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