Acculturation and Assimilation: A Qualitative Inquiry of Teacher Expectations for Somali Bantu Refugee Students

Nellie Tran, Dina Birman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article explored the range in teacher expectations held for Somali Bantu refugees using content analysis of one-on-one interviews with teachers who taught Somali Bantu students at an elementary school in Chicago. Analyses revealed the emergence of five categories of expectations: (a) general acculturative expectations around language and knowledge (b) behaviors, (c) internal attributes, (d) classroom behaviors, and (e) family/home. These findings raise questions about the potential danger of teacher’s expectations that might suggest assimilation to oppressive racial statuses. Implications for teachers and future research are discussed. Limitations and generalizability are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)712-736
Number of pages25
JournalEducation and Urban Society
Volume51
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2019

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acculturation
refugee
assimilation
student
teacher
elementary school
content analysis
classroom
interview
language
family
analysis
attribute
school

Keywords

  • change
  • multicultural education
  • social justice
  • students
  • teachers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

Acculturation and Assimilation : A Qualitative Inquiry of Teacher Expectations for Somali Bantu Refugee Students. / Tran, Nellie; Birman, Dina.

In: Education and Urban Society, Vol. 51, No. 5, 01.06.2019, p. 712-736.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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