Aberrant parasympathetic and hemodynamic function distinguishes a subgroup of psychologically distressed individuals with asymptomatic type-I diabetes mellitus

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Abstract

In a previous study, a subgroup of asymptomatic insulin-dependent diabetic individuals (termed IDDM-2) were identified on the basis of diminished parasympathetic cardiac input and elevated heart rate at rest. When compared to another group of asympromatic IDDM participants (termed IDDM-1), and a nondiabetic healthy control group, the IDDM-2 group displayed elevated blood pressure, supported by elevated total peripheral resistance. Measures of psychological regulation were also taken in this study, and form the basis of this article, which examined whether these IDDM-2 patients differed from the other two groups on these measures. The possible role of glycemic control, IDDM duration, and number of somatic complaints among group differences in psychological regulation was also examined. The IDDM-2 group reported increased psychological distress, as reflected by increased dysphoric or depressive symptoms, trait anxiety, perceived stress, and cynical hostility, as well as decreased optimism and interpersonal, but not family, social support. Glycemic control did not account for any of the group differences in psychological regulation. However, group differences in dysphoria and anxiety were accounted for by differences in somatic complaints, whereas differences in interpersonal social support were accounted for by IDDM duration. Moreover, none of the variables investigated accounted for the diminished optimism of the IDDM-2 group. Therefore, in individuals with IDDM, who would otherwise be considered, after medical examination, as no different from other asymptomatic IDDM individuals, the combination of diminished parasympathetic cardiac input and elevated heart rate was associated with aberrant alterations of both hemodynamic and psychological functioning; the increased psychological distress in these individuals may be influenced, in part, by increased diabetes duration and number of somatic symptoms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)78-94
Number of pages17
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 25 1999

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Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Hemodynamics
Psychology
Social Support
Anxiety
Heart Rate
Hostility
Vascular Resistance
Insulin
Depression
Blood Pressure
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Autonomic
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Dysphoria
  • Hostility
  • Optimism
  • Social support
  • Somatic symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

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title = "Aberrant parasympathetic and hemodynamic function distinguishes a subgroup of psychologically distressed individuals with asymptomatic type-I diabetes mellitus",
abstract = "In a previous study, a subgroup of asymptomatic insulin-dependent diabetic individuals (termed IDDM-2) were identified on the basis of diminished parasympathetic cardiac input and elevated heart rate at rest. When compared to another group of asympromatic IDDM participants (termed IDDM-1), and a nondiabetic healthy control group, the IDDM-2 group displayed elevated blood pressure, supported by elevated total peripheral resistance. Measures of psychological regulation were also taken in this study, and form the basis of this article, which examined whether these IDDM-2 patients differed from the other two groups on these measures. The possible role of glycemic control, IDDM duration, and number of somatic complaints among group differences in psychological regulation was also examined. The IDDM-2 group reported increased psychological distress, as reflected by increased dysphoric or depressive symptoms, trait anxiety, perceived stress, and cynical hostility, as well as decreased optimism and interpersonal, but not family, social support. Glycemic control did not account for any of the group differences in psychological regulation. However, group differences in dysphoria and anxiety were accounted for by differences in somatic complaints, whereas differences in interpersonal social support were accounted for by IDDM duration. Moreover, none of the variables investigated accounted for the diminished optimism of the IDDM-2 group. Therefore, in individuals with IDDM, who would otherwise be considered, after medical examination, as no different from other asymptomatic IDDM individuals, the combination of diminished parasympathetic cardiac input and elevated heart rate was associated with aberrant alterations of both hemodynamic and psychological functioning; the increased psychological distress in these individuals may be influenced, in part, by increased diabetes duration and number of somatic symptoms.",
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author = "Motivala, {Sarosh J.} and Barry Hurwitz and {La Greca}, {Annette M} and Maria Llabre and Marks, {Jennifer B} and Skyler, {Jay S} and Neil Schneiderman",
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AU - Motivala, Sarosh J.

AU - Hurwitz, Barry

AU - La Greca, Annette M

AU - Llabre, Maria

AU - Marks, Jennifer B

AU - Skyler, Jay S

AU - Schneiderman, Neil

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N2 - In a previous study, a subgroup of asymptomatic insulin-dependent diabetic individuals (termed IDDM-2) were identified on the basis of diminished parasympathetic cardiac input and elevated heart rate at rest. When compared to another group of asympromatic IDDM participants (termed IDDM-1), and a nondiabetic healthy control group, the IDDM-2 group displayed elevated blood pressure, supported by elevated total peripheral resistance. Measures of psychological regulation were also taken in this study, and form the basis of this article, which examined whether these IDDM-2 patients differed from the other two groups on these measures. The possible role of glycemic control, IDDM duration, and number of somatic complaints among group differences in psychological regulation was also examined. The IDDM-2 group reported increased psychological distress, as reflected by increased dysphoric or depressive symptoms, trait anxiety, perceived stress, and cynical hostility, as well as decreased optimism and interpersonal, but not family, social support. Glycemic control did not account for any of the group differences in psychological regulation. However, group differences in dysphoria and anxiety were accounted for by differences in somatic complaints, whereas differences in interpersonal social support were accounted for by IDDM duration. Moreover, none of the variables investigated accounted for the diminished optimism of the IDDM-2 group. Therefore, in individuals with IDDM, who would otherwise be considered, after medical examination, as no different from other asymptomatic IDDM individuals, the combination of diminished parasympathetic cardiac input and elevated heart rate was associated with aberrant alterations of both hemodynamic and psychological functioning; the increased psychological distress in these individuals may be influenced, in part, by increased diabetes duration and number of somatic symptoms.

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