A test of a hierarchical signalling model in song sparrows

William Searcy, Adrienne L. DuBois, Karla Rivera-Cáceres, Stephen Nowicki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hierarchical signalling may be a common adaptation for aggressive signalling. In this strategy an animal progresses through a series of discretely different signals of escalating level of threat before eventually proceeding to physical aggression. A model of such hierarchical aggressive signalling has been proposed for song sparrows, Melospiza melodia, in which a core part of the sequence is: song type match. → soft song. → attack. The model predicts that song type matching is a strong predictor of soft song, but only aweak predictor of attack. We used a two-part playback design to test these predictions, with an initial edge playback from just off the subject's territory using a song type that the subject could match, followed by a centre playback from a speaker placed well within the territory. Each male was tested twice with this design. We found that matching the edge playback did not predict soft song production at the centre. A second strong threat, wing waving, was actually negatively associated with matching. Matching the edge playback also was not associated with physical measures of aggression such as approach and latency to approach. Thus, this particular model of hierarchical aggressive signalling was not supported for our study population. Song type matching in our study population may have some function not associated with aggressive signalling to the matched individual, or no function at all.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)309-315
Number of pages7
JournalAnimal Behaviour
Volume86
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2013

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Passeriformes
song
animal communication
testing
aggression
test
prediction
animal

Keywords

  • Aggressive signalling
  • Hierarchical aggressive signaling
  • Melospiza melodia
  • Playback
  • Soft song
  • Song production
  • Song sparrow
  • Song type matching
  • Threat display

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

A test of a hierarchical signalling model in song sparrows. / Searcy, William; DuBois, Adrienne L.; Rivera-Cáceres, Karla; Nowicki, Stephen.

In: Animal Behaviour, Vol. 86, No. 2, 01.08.2013, p. 309-315.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Searcy, W, DuBois, AL, Rivera-Cáceres, K & Nowicki, S 2013, 'A test of a hierarchical signalling model in song sparrows', Animal Behaviour, vol. 86, no. 2, pp. 309-315. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2013.05.019
Searcy, William ; DuBois, Adrienne L. ; Rivera-Cáceres, Karla ; Nowicki, Stephen. / A test of a hierarchical signalling model in song sparrows. In: Animal Behaviour. 2013 ; Vol. 86, No. 2. pp. 309-315.
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