A simplified model for predicting malaria entomologic inoculation rates based on entomologic and parasitologic parameters relevant to control

G. F. Killeen, F. E. McKenzie, B. D. Foy, C. Schieffelin, P. F. Billingsley, John C Beier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

135 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Malaria transmission intensity is modeled from the starting perspective of individual vector mosquitoes and is expressed directly as the entomologic inoculation rate (EIR). The potential of individual mosquitoes to transmit malaria during their lifetime is presented graphically as a function of their feeding cycle length and survival, human biting preferences, and the parasite sporogonic incubation period. The EIR is then calculated as the product of 1) the potential of individual vectors to transmit malaria during their lifetime, 2) vector emergence rate relative to human population size, and 3) the infectiousness of the human population to vectors. Thus, impacts on more than one of these parameters will amplify each other's effects. The EIRs transmitted by the dominant vector species at four malaria-endemic sites from Papua New Guinea, Tanzania, and Nigeria were predicted using field measurements of these characteristics together with human biting rate and human reservoir infectiousness. This model predicted EIRs (± SD) that are 1.13 ± 0.37 (range = 0.84-1.59) times those measured in the field. For these four sites, mosquito emergence rate and lifetime transmission potential were more important determinants of the EIR than human reservoir infectiousness. This model and the input parameters from the four sites allow the potential impacts of various control measures on malaria transmission intensity to be tested under a range of endemic conditions. The model has potential applications for the development and implementation of transmission control measures and for public health education.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)535-544
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume62
Issue number5
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Malaria
Culicidae
Papua New Guinea
Tanzania
Nigeria
Population Density
Health Education
Parasites
Public Health
Survival
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

A simplified model for predicting malaria entomologic inoculation rates based on entomologic and parasitologic parameters relevant to control. / Killeen, G. F.; McKenzie, F. E.; Foy, B. D.; Schieffelin, C.; Billingsley, P. F.; Beier, John C.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 62, No. 5, 01.12.2000, p. 535-544.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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