A simple method for the control of medicinal leeches

Jay W. Granzow, Milton B. Armstrong, Zubin Panthaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, has been widely used in the salvage of microvascular free flaps. Numerous publications have detailed the biology, use, benefits, and risks of leech therapy. One reported significant risk is the risk of leech movement or migration from the surgical site, possibly into body orifices or even deeper into the wound itself. The authors report a simple method of limiting the movement of medicinal leeches from the surgical site, namely, affixing one end of a surgical suture to the leech and tying the free end to a firm object or dressing. This simple method limits the potential range of movement of the leech and reduces the risk of leech migration to unwanted areas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)461-462
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of Reconstructive Microsurgery
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2004

Fingerprint

Leeches
Leeching
Hirudo medicinalis
Free Tissue Flaps
Bandages
Sutures
Publications
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Leech
  • Microvascular free flap

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

A simple method for the control of medicinal leeches. / Granzow, Jay W.; Armstrong, Milton B.; Panthaki, Zubin.

In: Journal of Reconstructive Microsurgery, Vol. 20, No. 6, 01.08.2004, p. 461-462.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Granzow, Jay W. ; Armstrong, Milton B. ; Panthaki, Zubin. / A simple method for the control of medicinal leeches. In: Journal of Reconstructive Microsurgery. 2004 ; Vol. 20, No. 6. pp. 461-462.
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