A role for the tropical pacific coupled ocean-atmosphere system on milankovitch and millennial timescales. Part II

Global impacts

Mark Cane, Amy C Clement

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

112 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We offer the hypothesis that global scale millennial and glacial cycles may be initiated from the tropical Pacific. Part I used model results to illustrate how nonlinear ocean-atmosphere interactions in the tropical Pacific could generate variations in the field of sea surface temperature (SST) on both orbital and millennial timescales. The physics underlying these variations is essentially the same as that causing ENSO (El Niño - Southern Oscillation) variability in the modern climate. Here we argue that, as with ENSO but on paleoclimatic timescales, these changes in SST distribution will be accompanied by changes in the location of atmospheric convection, which will alter the global climate via atmospheric teleconnections. By analogy with ENSO, it is hypothesized that the cold phase will increase the glaciation over North America, increase low cloud cover, and reduce atmospheric water vapor. All tend to cool the earth either by increasing the planetary albedo or reducing greenhouse trapping. The warm phase has the opposite tendencies. We also critique the hypothesis that millennial changes are triggered by changes in the production of North Atlantic Deep Water.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMechanisms of Global Climate Change at Millennial Time Scales, 1999
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
Pages373-383
Number of pages11
Volume112
ISBN (Electronic)9781118664742
ISBN (Print)9780875900957
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameGeophysical Monograph Series
Volume112
ISSN (Print)0065-8448
ISSN (Electronic)2328-8779

Fingerprint

atmosphere-ocean system
Southern Oscillation
oceans
sea surface temperature
timescale
atmospheres
climate
atmospheric convection
cloud cover
North Atlantic Deep Water
greenhouses
deep water
teleconnection
albedo
glaciation
trapping
water vapor
global climate
tendencies
temperature distribution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics

Cite this

Cane, M., & Clement, A. C. (1999). A role for the tropical pacific coupled ocean-atmosphere system on milankovitch and millennial timescales. Part II: Global impacts. In Mechanisms of Global Climate Change at Millennial Time Scales, 1999 (Vol. 112, pp. 373-383). (Geophysical Monograph Series; Vol. 112). Blackwell Publishing Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1029/GM112p0373

A role for the tropical pacific coupled ocean-atmosphere system on milankovitch and millennial timescales. Part II : Global impacts. / Cane, Mark; Clement, Amy C.

Mechanisms of Global Climate Change at Millennial Time Scales, 1999. Vol. 112 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 1999. p. 373-383 (Geophysical Monograph Series; Vol. 112).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Cane, M & Clement, AC 1999, A role for the tropical pacific coupled ocean-atmosphere system on milankovitch and millennial timescales. Part II: Global impacts. in Mechanisms of Global Climate Change at Millennial Time Scales, 1999. vol. 112, Geophysical Monograph Series, vol. 112, Blackwell Publishing Ltd, pp. 373-383. https://doi.org/10.1029/GM112p0373
Cane M, Clement AC. A role for the tropical pacific coupled ocean-atmosphere system on milankovitch and millennial timescales. Part II: Global impacts. In Mechanisms of Global Climate Change at Millennial Time Scales, 1999. Vol. 112. Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 1999. p. 373-383. (Geophysical Monograph Series). https://doi.org/10.1029/GM112p0373
Cane, Mark ; Clement, Amy C. / A role for the tropical pacific coupled ocean-atmosphere system on milankovitch and millennial timescales. Part II : Global impacts. Mechanisms of Global Climate Change at Millennial Time Scales, 1999. Vol. 112 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 1999. pp. 373-383 (Geophysical Monograph Series).
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