A review of reef restoration and Coral propagation using the threatened genus Acropora in the Caribbean and western Atlantic

C. N. Young, S. A. Schopmeyer, Diego Lirman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

114 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Coral reef restoration has gained recent popularity in response to the steady decline of corals and the recognition that coral reefs may not be able to recover naturally without human intervention. To synthesize collective knowledge about reef restoration focused particularly on the threatened genus Acropora in the Caribbean and western Atlantic, we conducted a literature review combined with personal communications with restoration practitioners and an online questionnaire to identify the most effective reef restoration methods and the major obstacles hindering restoration success. Most participants (90%) strongly believe that Acropora populations are severely degraded, continue to decline, and may not recover without human intervention. Low-cost methods such as coral gardening and fragment stabilization were ranked as the most effective restoration activities for this genus. High financial costs, the small footprint of restoration activities, and the potential damage to wild populations were identified as major concerns, while increased public awareness and education were ranked as the highest benefits of coral reef restoration. This study highlights the advantages and outlines the concerns associated with coral reef restoration and creates a unique synthesis of coral restoration activities as a complementary management tool to help guide "best-practices" for future restoration efforts throughout the region.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1075-1098
Number of pages24
JournalBulletin of Marine Science
Volume88
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2012

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Acropora
coral reefs
corals
reefs
coral
reef
coral reef
gardening
animal communication
education
questionnaires
synthesis
restoration
methodology
wild population
literature review
cost
footprint
stabilization
communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Oceanography

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A review of reef restoration and Coral propagation using the threatened genus Acropora in the Caribbean and western Atlantic. / Young, C. N.; Schopmeyer, S. A.; Lirman, Diego.

In: Bulletin of Marine Science, Vol. 88, No. 4, 01.10.2012, p. 1075-1098.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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