A review of a bi-layered living cell treatment (Apligraf) in the treatment of venous leg ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers.

Larissa Zaulyanov, Robert Kirsner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

121 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Apligraf (Organogenesis, Canton, MA) is a bi-layered bioengineered skin substitute and was the first engineered skin US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved to promote the healing of ulcers that have failed standard wound care. Constructed by culturing human foreskin-derived neonatal fibroblasts in a bovine type I collagen matrix over which human foreskin-derived neonatal epidermal keratinocytes are then cultured and allowed to stratify, Apligraf provides both cells and matrix for the nonhealing wound. Its exact mechanism of action is not known, but it is known to produce cytokines and growth factors similar to healthy human skin. Initially approved by the FDA in 1998 for the treatment of venous ulcers greater than one-month duration that have not adequately responded to conventional therapy, Apligraf later received approval in 2000 for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers of greater than three weeks duration. Herein, we review the use of Apligraf in the treatment of chronic venous leg ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers. Our goal is to provide a working understanding of appropriate patient selection and proper use of the product for any physician treating this segment of the aging population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)93-98
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Interventions in Aging
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

Fingerprint

Varicose Ulcer
Leg Ulcer
Diabetic Foot
Foreskin
United States Food and Drug Administration
Artificial Skin
Skin
Organogenesis
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics
Collagen Type I
Keratinocytes
Patient Selection
Ulcer
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Fibroblasts
Cytokines
Physicians
Apligraf
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

A review of a bi-layered living cell treatment (Apligraf) in the treatment of venous leg ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers. / Zaulyanov, Larissa; Kirsner, Robert.

In: Clinical Interventions in Aging, Vol. 2, No. 1, 01.12.2007, p. 93-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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