A report from the 2013 international workshop: radiation and cardiovascular disease, Hiroshima, Japan.

Ikuno Takahashi, Waka Ohishi, Fred A. Mettler, Kotaro Ozasa, Peter Jacob, Nobuhiko Ban, Steven E Lipshultz, Fiona Anne Stewart, Toru Nabika, Yasuharu Niwa, Norio Takahashi, Masazumi Akahoshi, Kazunori Kodama, Roy Shore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two longitudinal cohort studies of Japanese atomic bomb survivors-the life span study (LSS) and the adult health study (AHS)-from the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) indicate that total body irradiation doses less than 1 Gy are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but several questions about this association remain.In particular, the diversity of heart disease subtypes and the high prevalence of other risk factors complicate the estimates of radiation effects. Subtype-specific analyses with more reliable diagnostic criteria and measurement techniques are needed. The radiation effects on CVD risk are probably tissue-reaction (deterministic) effects, so the dose-response relationships for various subtypes of CVD may be nonlinear and therefore should be explored with several types of statistical models.Subpopulations at high risk need to be identified because effects at lower radiation doses may occur primarily in these susceptible subpopulations. Whether other CVD risk factors modify radiation effects also needs to be determined. Finally, background rates for various subtypes of CVD have historically differed substantially between Japanese and Western populations, so the generalisability to other populations needs to be examined.Cardiovascular disease mechanisms and manifestations may differ between high-dose local irradiation and low-dose total body irradiation (TBI)-microvascular damage and altered metabolism from low-dose TBI, but coronary artery atherosclerosis and thrombotic myocardial infarcts at high localised doses. For TBI, doses to organs other than the heart may be important in pathogenesis of CVD, so data on renal and liver disorders, plaque instability, microvascular damage, metabolic disorders, hypertension and various CVD biomarkers and risk factors are needed. Epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies at doses of less than 1 Gy are necessary to clarify the effects of radiation on CVD risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)869-880
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of radiological protection : official journal of the Society for Radiological Protection
Volume33
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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cardiovascular disease
Japan
Cardiovascular Diseases
Radiation
Education
Radiation Effects
Whole-Body Irradiation
irradiation
risk factor
subpopulation
Nuclear Weapons
radiation
hypertension
damage
Statistical Models
dose-response relationship
Population
dose
Longitudinal Studies
Survivors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A report from the 2013 international workshop : radiation and cardiovascular disease, Hiroshima, Japan. / Takahashi, Ikuno; Ohishi, Waka; Mettler, Fred A.; Ozasa, Kotaro; Jacob, Peter; Ban, Nobuhiko; Lipshultz, Steven E; Stewart, Fiona Anne; Nabika, Toru; Niwa, Yasuharu; Takahashi, Norio; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Kodama, Kazunori; Shore, Roy.

In: Journal of radiological protection : official journal of the Society for Radiological Protection, Vol. 33, No. 4, 01.12.2013, p. 869-880.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takahashi, I, Ohishi, W, Mettler, FA, Ozasa, K, Jacob, P, Ban, N, Lipshultz, SE, Stewart, FA, Nabika, T, Niwa, Y, Takahashi, N, Akahoshi, M, Kodama, K & Shore, R 2013, 'A report from the 2013 international workshop: radiation and cardiovascular disease, Hiroshima, Japan.', Journal of radiological protection : official journal of the Society for Radiological Protection, vol. 33, no. 4, pp. 869-880.
Takahashi, Ikuno ; Ohishi, Waka ; Mettler, Fred A. ; Ozasa, Kotaro ; Jacob, Peter ; Ban, Nobuhiko ; Lipshultz, Steven E ; Stewart, Fiona Anne ; Nabika, Toru ; Niwa, Yasuharu ; Takahashi, Norio ; Akahoshi, Masazumi ; Kodama, Kazunori ; Shore, Roy. / A report from the 2013 international workshop : radiation and cardiovascular disease, Hiroshima, Japan. In: Journal of radiological protection : official journal of the Society for Radiological Protection. 2013 ; Vol. 33, No. 4. pp. 869-880.
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