A randomized, double blind controlled trial of the efficacy of immune serum globulin for the prevention of post transfusion hepatitis. A Veterans Administration cooperative study

L. B. Seeff, H. J. Zimmerman, E. C. Wright, J. D. Finkelstein, P. Garcia-Pont, H. B. Greenlee, A. A. Dietz, C. M. Leevy, C. H. Tamburro, Eugene R Schiff, E. M. Schimmel, R. Zemel, D. S. Zimmon, R. W. McCollum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

148 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A double blind, randomized, controlled trial has been conducted in 11 Veterans Administration hospitals during a 49 month period to compare the relative efficacies of immune serum globulin (ISG)and an albumin placebo for the prevention of post transfusion hepatitis (PTH). A total of 2204 patients, of whom 1094 received ISG, participated in the study. The results indicate that ISG significantly reduced the incidence of icteric type non B hepatitis only (inferred to be also type non A hepatitis). Adverse reactions were rare, and the ISG did not significantly alter the incubation period or duration of the disease. The data suggest, however, that a similar reduction in type non A, non B hepatitis would have occurred had commercial blood been excluded from use. Analysis of the 241 patients who developed hepatitis indicates that type B hepatitis constituted less than 20% of the cases each year of the study. Furthermore, the efficacy of the ISG, manufactured in 1944, against apparent type non A, non B hepatitis suggests that this overlooked disease has existed from at least that time. Host and transfusion related factors that might have modified the development of PTH were examined. The use of commercial blood was observed to be the most important risk factor. It is concluded that the PTH incidence can be most effectively reduced by eliminating commercial donor blood, and continuing to screen volunteer donors for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) by sensitive procedures. Of prime importance is the need to define the agent(s) responsible for type non A, non B hepatitis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111-121
Number of pages11
JournalGastroenterology
Volume72
Issue number1
StatePublished - Sep 11 1977

Fingerprint

Serum Globulins
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Hepatitis B
Hepatitis
Immunoglobulins
Immune Sera
Veterans Hospitals
Incidence
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens
Blood Donors
Serum Albumin
Volunteers
Randomized Controlled Trials
Placebos
Tissue Donors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Seeff, L. B., Zimmerman, H. J., Wright, E. C., Finkelstein, J. D., Garcia-Pont, P., Greenlee, H. B., ... McCollum, R. W. (1977). A randomized, double blind controlled trial of the efficacy of immune serum globulin for the prevention of post transfusion hepatitis. A Veterans Administration cooperative study. Gastroenterology, 72(1), 111-121.

A randomized, double blind controlled trial of the efficacy of immune serum globulin for the prevention of post transfusion hepatitis. A Veterans Administration cooperative study. / Seeff, L. B.; Zimmerman, H. J.; Wright, E. C.; Finkelstein, J. D.; Garcia-Pont, P.; Greenlee, H. B.; Dietz, A. A.; Leevy, C. M.; Tamburro, C. H.; Schiff, Eugene R; Schimmel, E. M.; Zemel, R.; Zimmon, D. S.; McCollum, R. W.

In: Gastroenterology, Vol. 72, No. 1, 11.09.1977, p. 111-121.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seeff, LB, Zimmerman, HJ, Wright, EC, Finkelstein, JD, Garcia-Pont, P, Greenlee, HB, Dietz, AA, Leevy, CM, Tamburro, CH, Schiff, ER, Schimmel, EM, Zemel, R, Zimmon, DS & McCollum, RW 1977, 'A randomized, double blind controlled trial of the efficacy of immune serum globulin for the prevention of post transfusion hepatitis. A Veterans Administration cooperative study', Gastroenterology, vol. 72, no. 1, pp. 111-121.
Seeff, L. B. ; Zimmerman, H. J. ; Wright, E. C. ; Finkelstein, J. D. ; Garcia-Pont, P. ; Greenlee, H. B. ; Dietz, A. A. ; Leevy, C. M. ; Tamburro, C. H. ; Schiff, Eugene R ; Schimmel, E. M. ; Zemel, R. ; Zimmon, D. S. ; McCollum, R. W. / A randomized, double blind controlled trial of the efficacy of immune serum globulin for the prevention of post transfusion hepatitis. A Veterans Administration cooperative study. In: Gastroenterology. 1977 ; Vol. 72, No. 1. pp. 111-121.
@article{a611d8d546f143caa7bf17e75d2016df,
title = "A randomized, double blind controlled trial of the efficacy of immune serum globulin for the prevention of post transfusion hepatitis. A Veterans Administration cooperative study",
abstract = "A double blind, randomized, controlled trial has been conducted in 11 Veterans Administration hospitals during a 49 month period to compare the relative efficacies of immune serum globulin (ISG)and an albumin placebo for the prevention of post transfusion hepatitis (PTH). A total of 2204 patients, of whom 1094 received ISG, participated in the study. The results indicate that ISG significantly reduced the incidence of icteric type non B hepatitis only (inferred to be also type non A hepatitis). Adverse reactions were rare, and the ISG did not significantly alter the incubation period or duration of the disease. The data suggest, however, that a similar reduction in type non A, non B hepatitis would have occurred had commercial blood been excluded from use. Analysis of the 241 patients who developed hepatitis indicates that type B hepatitis constituted less than 20{\%} of the cases each year of the study. Furthermore, the efficacy of the ISG, manufactured in 1944, against apparent type non A, non B hepatitis suggests that this overlooked disease has existed from at least that time. Host and transfusion related factors that might have modified the development of PTH were examined. The use of commercial blood was observed to be the most important risk factor. It is concluded that the PTH incidence can be most effectively reduced by eliminating commercial donor blood, and continuing to screen volunteer donors for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) by sensitive procedures. Of prime importance is the need to define the agent(s) responsible for type non A, non B hepatitis.",
author = "Seeff, {L. B.} and Zimmerman, {H. J.} and Wright, {E. C.} and Finkelstein, {J. D.} and P. Garcia-Pont and Greenlee, {H. B.} and Dietz, {A. A.} and Leevy, {C. M.} and Tamburro, {C. H.} and Schiff, {Eugene R} and Schimmel, {E. M.} and R. Zemel and Zimmon, {D. S.} and McCollum, {R. W.}",
year = "1977",
month = "9",
day = "11",
language = "English",
volume = "72",
pages = "111--121",
journal = "Gastroenterology",
issn = "0016-5085",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A randomized, double blind controlled trial of the efficacy of immune serum globulin for the prevention of post transfusion hepatitis. A Veterans Administration cooperative study

AU - Seeff, L. B.

AU - Zimmerman, H. J.

AU - Wright, E. C.

AU - Finkelstein, J. D.

AU - Garcia-Pont, P.

AU - Greenlee, H. B.

AU - Dietz, A. A.

AU - Leevy, C. M.

AU - Tamburro, C. H.

AU - Schiff, Eugene R

AU - Schimmel, E. M.

AU - Zemel, R.

AU - Zimmon, D. S.

AU - McCollum, R. W.

PY - 1977/9/11

Y1 - 1977/9/11

N2 - A double blind, randomized, controlled trial has been conducted in 11 Veterans Administration hospitals during a 49 month period to compare the relative efficacies of immune serum globulin (ISG)and an albumin placebo for the prevention of post transfusion hepatitis (PTH). A total of 2204 patients, of whom 1094 received ISG, participated in the study. The results indicate that ISG significantly reduced the incidence of icteric type non B hepatitis only (inferred to be also type non A hepatitis). Adverse reactions were rare, and the ISG did not significantly alter the incubation period or duration of the disease. The data suggest, however, that a similar reduction in type non A, non B hepatitis would have occurred had commercial blood been excluded from use. Analysis of the 241 patients who developed hepatitis indicates that type B hepatitis constituted less than 20% of the cases each year of the study. Furthermore, the efficacy of the ISG, manufactured in 1944, against apparent type non A, non B hepatitis suggests that this overlooked disease has existed from at least that time. Host and transfusion related factors that might have modified the development of PTH were examined. The use of commercial blood was observed to be the most important risk factor. It is concluded that the PTH incidence can be most effectively reduced by eliminating commercial donor blood, and continuing to screen volunteer donors for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) by sensitive procedures. Of prime importance is the need to define the agent(s) responsible for type non A, non B hepatitis.

AB - A double blind, randomized, controlled trial has been conducted in 11 Veterans Administration hospitals during a 49 month period to compare the relative efficacies of immune serum globulin (ISG)and an albumin placebo for the prevention of post transfusion hepatitis (PTH). A total of 2204 patients, of whom 1094 received ISG, participated in the study. The results indicate that ISG significantly reduced the incidence of icteric type non B hepatitis only (inferred to be also type non A hepatitis). Adverse reactions were rare, and the ISG did not significantly alter the incubation period or duration of the disease. The data suggest, however, that a similar reduction in type non A, non B hepatitis would have occurred had commercial blood been excluded from use. Analysis of the 241 patients who developed hepatitis indicates that type B hepatitis constituted less than 20% of the cases each year of the study. Furthermore, the efficacy of the ISG, manufactured in 1944, against apparent type non A, non B hepatitis suggests that this overlooked disease has existed from at least that time. Host and transfusion related factors that might have modified the development of PTH were examined. The use of commercial blood was observed to be the most important risk factor. It is concluded that the PTH incidence can be most effectively reduced by eliminating commercial donor blood, and continuing to screen volunteer donors for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) by sensitive procedures. Of prime importance is the need to define the agent(s) responsible for type non A, non B hepatitis.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0017344544&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0017344544&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 72

SP - 111

EP - 121

JO - Gastroenterology

JF - Gastroenterology

SN - 0016-5085

IS - 1

ER -