A randomized controlled trial of the efficacy of a stigma reduction intervention for HIV-infected women in the deep south

Julie Barroso, Michael V. Relf, Megan Scull Williams, Joyell Arscott, Elizabeth D. Moore, Courtney Caiola, Susan G. Silva

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare outcomes (self-esteem, coping self-efficacy, and internalized stigma) across time in HIV-infected women living in the Deep South who received a stigma reduction intervention (n=51) with those of a control group (n=49) who received the usual care at baseline, and at 30 and 90 days. We recruited 99 women from clinics and an AIDS service organization; they were randomized by recruitment site. A video developed from the results of a qualitative metasynthesis study of women with HIV infection was loaded onto iPod Touch devices. Participants were asked to watch the video weekly for 4 weeks, and to record the number of times they viewed it over a 12-week period. We examined the trajectory model results for efficacy outcomes for the intent-to-treat and the supplemental completers groups. There was a treatment-by-time effect for improved self-esteem (intent-to-treat: p=0.0308; completers: p=0.0284) and decreases in internalized stigma (intent-to-treat: p=0.0036; completers: p=0.0060), and a treatment-by-time-by-time effect for improved coping self-efficacy (intent-to-treat: p=0.0414; completers: p=0.0321). A medium effect of the intervention in terms of improving self-esteem was observed when compared with the control condition in those who completed the study. The magnitude of the intervention effect, however, was large with regard to reducing overall stigma, improving social relationships, and decreasing stereotypes in both groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)489-498
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS patient care and STDs
Volume28
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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    Barroso, J., Relf, M. V., Williams, M. S., Arscott, J., Moore, E. D., Caiola, C., & Silva, S. G. (2014). A randomized controlled trial of the efficacy of a stigma reduction intervention for HIV-infected women in the deep south. AIDS patient care and STDs, 28(9), 489-498. https://doi.org/10.1089/apc.2014.0014